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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 788 788 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 80 80 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 64 64 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 63 63 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 60 60 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 32 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 31 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 26 26 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 24 24 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 23 23 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for July 2nd or search for July 2nd in all documents.

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, with the loss of one killed and two dangerously wounded, he succeeded in destroying the whole party, thirteen in number. This was a very gallant skirmish with a ravaging band. Dodge, with eighteen men, attacked the Indians in a swamp. Under cover of the high bank of a small lake they wounded two of his men; but the rest charged them, and, in a hand-to-hand encounter, in a space scarcely forty feet square, killed all the Indians except two, who were shot trying to swim the lake. On the 2d and 3d of July the main body encamped one and a half mile from Lake Cosconong, where the Indians had evidently remained some time. Fresh signs were discovered of small parties; but the main trail was toward the head of Rock River. General Brady was here obliged, by sickness, to turn over the command to General Atkinson. By the 6th of July, Generals Dodge, Alexander, Posey, and Henry, were brought into concert on both banks of Rock River, near the mouth of White Water Creek, with an almost i
He said many times afterward, I hoped and expected that I had others who would prove generals, but I knew I had one, and that was Sidney Johnston. Itinerary. 1861. June 16.Left Los Angeles — to Rancho Chino, thirty-five miles. June 22.Arrived at Warner's Ranch. One hundred miles from Los Angeles. June 27.Left Warner's. To Vallecito. June 30.Left Vallecito. Sunday night. Eighteen miles to Carrizo Wells. Comet seen. July 1.Left Carrizo, 3 P. M. Thirty-seven miles to Indian Wells. July 2.Indian Wells at noon. Twenty-eight miles to Alamo Springs. July 3.Alamo Springs at 8 A. M. Thirty miles to Cook's Wells. July 4.Cook's to Yeager's Ferry. (Fort Yuma.) July 7.Yuma, up the Gila, and thence two hundred and seventy miles to Tucson. July 18.Arrived at Tucson. July 22.Left Tucson, 8 A. M. Thirty miles. July 23.Forty miles to a dry camp. July 24.Fifteen miles to Dragoon Springs, thence fifty miles to Apache Pass. July 25. July 26. July 27.From Apache Pass. One hundred and
to keep the peace. They executed it by an immediate and unconditional surrender to the war party of the North. Immediately after Lincoln's first call for volunteers, two regiments were recruited in Ohio, near Cincinnati, known as the First and Second Kentucky Regiments. Early in June, Lovell H. Rousseau established Camp Joe Holt, in Indiana, opposite Louisville, and began to recruit the Louisville Legion. The first overt attempt to organize Federal troops on Kentucky soil was on the 2d of July, when 2,000 men assembled at Camp Dick Robinson, near the centre of the State. Lieutenant William Nelson, of the Navy, afterward a major-general, was the secret agent through whom the Union men were organized and armed. Seeing the drift of public sentiment and the popularity of neutrality in Kentucky, the more ardent secessionists left the State and entered the Confederate army. Camp Boone was established in Tennessee, near the State line, not far from Clarksville. The Southern party