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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 788 788 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 80 80 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 64 64 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 63 63 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 60 60 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 32 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 31 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 26 26 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 24 24 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 23 23 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for July 2nd or search for July 2nd in all documents.

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the enemy. This proves how often the plans of a general are frustrated by unlooked — for contingencies. General Meade broke up his quarters at Taneytown, as he states, at eleven P. M. on Wednesday, and reached Gettysburgh at one A. M. Thursday, July second. Early in the morning he set to work examining the position of the various army corps. It is hardly true to say that he imitated the example of all prudent commanders on the eve of a battle, and made a complete survey of the ground he o ridge described by Historicus, and precipitated the battle on most unfortunate ground. It hardly seems possible that one who has ever seen the ground can gainsay this. When General Sickles moved forward his corps, on the afternoon of the second of July, from its appropriate place in the general line, he excited the astonishment of the thousands of lookers on. It was a magnificent sight, but excited the gravest apprehension, and the writer well recollects the remarks made at the time by some