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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 788 788 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 80 80 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 64 64 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 63 63 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 60 60 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 32 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 31 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 26 26 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 24 24 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 23 23 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for July 2nd or search for July 2nd in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: travel 1843-1844; aet. 24-25 (search)
ed friend. Not only did he show the travellers every possible attention in London, but finding that they were planning a tour through Wales, Ireland, and Scotland, he made out with great care an itinerary for them, giving the roads by which they should travel and the points of interest they should visit. Very reluctantly they left the London of so many delights, and started on the prescribed tour, following in the main the lines laid down by their kind friend. To her sister Louisa Sunday, July 2. ... We are in Dublin, among the Paddies, and funny enough they are. There are many beggars — you cannot get into the carriage without being surrounded with ragged women holding out their dirty hands, and clamouring for ha'pence-we have just returned from Edgeworthtown; on our way, we walked into some of the peasants' huts. I will tell you about one-it was thatched, built very miserably, had no floor except the native mud; there was a peat fire, which filled the house with smoke — b
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
the Greek Minister at eight o'clock, and to the soirge of the Academy. To Chelsea, to call upon Mrs. Oscar Wilde.... He showed me with pride a fine boy of five years. We had some talk of old times, of his visit to America; I reminded him of the vermilion balcony at which he laughed. [Wilde had complained that the usual pronunciation of these words was prosaic.] June 30.... Mrs. Oscar Wilde asks us to take tea on Thursday; she has invited Walter Pater.... Have writ to James Bryce. July 2. To see Oscar Wilde's play, Lady Windermere's Fan, at St. James's Theatre. We went by invitation to his box, where were Lady Wilde and Mrs. Oscar. The play was perfectly acted, and is excellent of its kind, the motif not new, but the denouement original in treatment. After the play to call on Lady Rothschild, then to Constance Flower, Lady Battersea. who showed us her superb house full of treasures of art. July 4. Mrs. [Edmund] Gosse came and took us to Alma-Tadema's beautiful house
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: looking toward sunset 1903-1905; aet. 84-86 (search)
ns in many countries.) it is remembered that in these days when she was leaving Gardiner at the last moment she handed Laura i a note. It read, be sure to rub the knee thoroughly night and morning! why, she was asked, did I not have this a week ago? I hate to be rubbed! she said. July 1. Oak Glen.... found a typed copy of my rest sermon, delivered in our own church, twelve years ago. Surely preaching has been my greatest privilege and in it I have done some of my best work. July 2. unusually depressed at waking. Feared that I might be visited by senile melancholia against which I shall pray with all my might.... began Plato's Laws. Plato seems to have acted as a tonic, for on the same day she writes to her daughter-in-law, expressing her joy in Harry's latest honor, the degree of Doctor of Laws conferred by Harvard College:-- to Mrs. Henry Marion Howe Oai Glen, July 2, 1905. Thanks very much for your good letter, giving me such a gratifying account of the do
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the sundown splendid and serene 1906-1907; aet. 87-88 (search)
ho are raising instead of lowering the tone of the atmosphere in which they live. Avoid the companionship of those who deride sacred things and are inclined to ignore the limits of refinement and good taste. Remember that ignoble amusements react upon character. Never forget that we grow like to that we contemplate. Keep it always in mind that it must be through our own efforts that our progress through life shall bring with it the fulfilment of the best promise of our youth. July 2. Oak Glen. Nurse Voshell, nicknamed by me Wollapuk, left this morning. I have become so dependent upon her that I shall miss her very much. I have been impatient of having her so long, but now see how very helpful she has been to me. I began to write a retrospect of my essay on Distinctions between Philosophy and Religion, but feel that this will be of little value. Oh! that I had taken Dr. Hedge's advice and published these papers soon after they were written. As it is I have lost t