Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for July 3rd or search for July 3rd in all documents.

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ion, as it was known that the latter was being largely reenforced from Bragg's army in Middle and East-Tennessee. Under these circumstances, General Grant deternmined to attempt to carry the place by assault. Two unsuccessful attacks were made on the nineteenth and twenty-second of May; but as reenforcements reached him a few days after, sufficiently large to enable him to completely invest the rebel defences, he resorted to the slower but more effective way of a regular siege. By the third of July his sappers were so far advanced as to render his success certain, and on that day General Pemberton proposed an armistice and capitulation, which were finally accepted, and Vicksburgh surrendered on the fourth of July. In the language of General Grant's official report, the results of this short campaign were: The defeat of the enemy in five battles outside of Vicksburgh; the occupation of Jackson, the capital of the State of Mississippi, and the capture of Vicksburgh and its garriso
was necessary, at last, to save the left of our army, it is almost incredible that the single corps of General Sickles was able to withstand the impetuous onset of Longstreet's legions for nearly an hour before any succor reached it. On Friday, July third, the enemy renewed their efforts to carry out the original design of Lee by overthrowing our left wing, and Longstreet was reenforced by Pickett's three brigades, and further supported by one division and two brigades from Hill's corps. r generals, shows that all his sympathies were with the South, and he takes no pains to conceal his prejudices against the North. Speaking of the moment when the columns of Longstreet had been finally repulsed by our left, on Friday afternoon, July third, he says: It is difficult to exaggerate the critical state of affairs, as they appeared about this time. If the enemy or his general had shown any enterprise, there is no saying what might have happened. General Longstreet talked to me, he na