Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for July 3rd or search for July 3rd in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate dead buried in the Vicksburg Cemetery. (search)
47th Ohio. June 14—Wm. Teracy, Company G, 4th (West) Virginia, a prisoner. June 14—Lieut. Lace, 17th Louisiana. June 15—Lieut. Sam Bates, Company I, 22d Iowa. June 17—Col. Garrott, interred by his friends. June 19—C. B. Hooper, Company K, 99th Illinois. June 20—Lieut. J. H. Langston, Company B, 5th Regiment, Mississippi S. T. June 22—R. Kenell, Botetourt Artillery. June 24—Lieut. Col. McLaurin, (officers' lot). June 26—J. J. Banks, Partisan Rangers. June 27—Major (Brigadier.) Gen. Green, of Missouri. Buried on Geo. Marshall lot. June 27—Prisoner, unknown. June 27—Lieut. Col. Griffin, of 31st Louisiana. June 28—Five soldiers from Washington Hotel. June 30—G. R. Moreley, Botetourt Artillery. June 30—Sergt. E. Jones, Company D, 38th Mississippi. July 2—Lieut. J. Kelsey, Company A, 61st Tennessee. July 3—J. N. New, Botetourt Artillery. July 4—Lieut. V. M. Stevenson, Company F, 1st Arkansas. July
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
e Ohio raid, having been assigned to other important duty with Bragg's Army. On June 11 Morgan's command started on their great and disastrous raid by moving out of camp at Alexandria, Tenn. All of the 11th Kentucky Cavalry did not go on this raid, perhaps two hundred of them remaining in Tennessee on other duty. They crossed the river near the village of Rome; and, fighting and skirmishing incessantly, went into camp at Burkesville, where they remained for several days. On the night of July 3 they bivouaced at Columbia, in Adair County. Early on the morning of July 4, 1863, the command reached Green River Bridge, in Adair County, where they found Colonel Orlando H. Moore, of the 25th Michigan, strongly intrenched with his regiment. In attempting to dislodge him from his position, General Morgan had probably the most disastrous engagement of his entire military career. He never made an official report of this battle for the reason that he was taken prisoner before he had an opp