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d fighting ground in lower Lousiana. Taylor, in this campaign, had a variety of reasons. One of these was the gathering of beef cattle for the relief of the starving garrison of the Port. In a campaign, Dick Taylor always seemed to deal in surprises, even to his friends. His instant grasp of a situation; his power of quick concentration; his sudden appearances, with that other gift of masking his designs in the face of an enemy, made him an enigma among the commanders of Louisiana. On July 4th, reporting his success in southern Louisiana, he said, I have used every exertion to relieve Port Hudson and shall continue to the last. But on that very day Vicksburg was surrendered. He then clearly saw that the loss of Vicksburg was sure to bring with it that of Port Hudson. Taylor's plan of relief had thus received an immediate quietus. Even a sudden dash upon New Orleans, a surprise never long couchant in his mind—was unwillingly deferred under advice of Gen. Kirby Smith. Returnin
orne away from ambitious competitors in the prizes of peace at Yale. His classics in nothing detracted from his dash upon the field, however much Plutarch may have offered him models for imitation. For six months the army of the Cumberland, in and around Murfreesboro, did naught but face Bragg. Halleck, from Washington, was pressing Rosecrans to open anew the campaign; Grant, from Vicksburg, was urging him potently to attack Bragg. Around Vicksburg Grant's hopes, between May 18th and July 4th, had whirled with the singleness of personal ambition. All he then needed Rosecrans for was solely to keep Bragg from sending help to Pemberton. Finally Rosecrans, under this forcing process, moved on June 23d, with a force of 60,000 men. Bragg was at Shelbyville with 43,000—rather less than more. Rosecrans had begun by pushing Bragg out of his fortified posts—such as Tullahoma, which the Confederates had used as a depot of supplies—and driving him to new headquarters. It was a short ca<