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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
further orders; but it was not sent forward. Stevenson's division was repulsed, with the loss of a thousand men killed and wounded. The Maryland battery lost none, though under a severe artillery fire the whole time. On the night of the 4th of July the battalion was ordered to the Chattahoochee river; thence on the 9th to within eight miles of Atlanta, on the Green's Ferry road; thence to Mill Creek road, where, on the 20th, an attack was made by the enemy, which was repulsed. General Jto seize the opportunity and try to relieve the pressure on Lee by a rapid advance to the Potomac and demonstrations against Washington and Baltimore. Leaving Salem on June 24, Early marched rapidly to the Potomac, a distance of 212 miles, by July 4th, driving Sigel's forces from Martinsburg and other points, to take refuge on the Maryland Heights. Mr. Pond praises Sigel for remaining there with 6,000 or 8,000 men when he should have joined Wallace's troops advancing from Baltimore. Early fi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
ok part in every movement. On the 22d, at Marietta, the battery was ordered out on the field with General Stevenson's division, to charge the right wing of the enemy's line. It was placed on a hill half a mile from the Federal force, there to await further orders; but it was not sent forward. Stevenson's division was repulsed, with the loss of a thousand men killed and wounded. The Maryland battery lost none, though under a severe artillery fire the whole time. On the night of the 4th of July the battalion was ordered to the Chattahoochee river; thence on the 9th to within eight miles of Atlanta, on the Green's Ferry road; thence to Mill Creek road, where, on the 20th, an attack was made by the enemy, which was repulsed. General Johnston had been superseded by General Hood on the 14th of July. This was much regretted by the line officers and the rank and file of the army. Siege of Atlanta. Next day the battery was ordered to Atlanta, and on the morning of the 22d was a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
His instructions were to destroy Hunter if possible, and to threaten Maryland and Washington city by an advance northward, if the way should be open. Hunter was now out of reach, and his flight left the road to the Potomac open. Early, determined to seize the opportunity and try to relieve the pressure on Lee by a rapid advance to the Potomac and demonstrations against Washington and Baltimore. Leaving Salem on June 24, Early marched rapidly to the Potomac, a distance of 212 miles, by July 4th, driving Sigel's forces from Martinsburg and other points, to take refuge on the Maryland Heights. Mr. Pond praises Sigel for remaining there with 6,000 or 8,000 men when he should have joined Wallace's troops advancing from Baltimore. Early finding he could not get at Siegel, marched round him, and on July 9th, entered Frederick; on the same day he attacked Wallace, who, with some garrison troops and Rickett's division, of the Sixth corps, which Grant had sent up, was holding the line of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 77 (search)
night to agree upon terms. This was the end of the extraordinary wise movement to prevent the opening of the Mississippi river. It was a death blow to the unity of action of the southern armies. The whole siege was a farce so far as it meant a bloody and determined defense of the fortified position of Vicksburg. No large supplies of provisions had been accumulated inside of the works, munitions of war were scarce, and when Grant gave Pemberton Hobson's choice of surrendering on the 4th of July or a fight, he put on his little airs, but threw up the sponge on the natal day of the republic. Taking Colonel Scott's advice I did not fire the mine, but went down to the lower city. On my way I heard the rapid gallop of horses, and on looking behind me saw General Grant and staff, and at the tail end of the staff Fred. Grant in his shirt sleeves. General Grant's dark face, with its short, black, stubby beard, gave me the impression at the time that it was the face of a just but dete