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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
Infantry. No. 109Capt. William J. Fetterman, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, commanding Second Battalion, of operations May 4-July 5. No. 110Capt. James Mooney, Nineteenth U. S. Infantry, commanding First Battalion. No. 111Col. Benjamin F. Scribner, Thirty-eighth Indiana Infantry, commanding Third Brigade, of operations May 7-July 5. No. 112Col. Marshall F. Moore, Sixty-ninth Ohio Infantry, commanding Third Brigade, of operations July 15-September 8. No. 113Lieut. Col. Willian D. Ward, Thirty-se Arnold McMahan, Twenty-first Ohio Infantry. No. 117Col. Josiah Given, Seventy-fourth Ohio Infantry, of operations May 7-July 5 and August 16-September 5. No. 118Maj. Joseph Fisher, Seventy-fourth Ohio Infantry, of operations July 5-August 15. No.July 5-August 15. No. 119Col. William Sirwell, Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Infantry, of operations August 14-15 (Wheeler's raid). No. 120Maj. Michael H. Locher, Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania Infantry. No. 121Col. Henry A. Hambright, Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania Infantry, of
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
line was nearly six miles. On the 4th of July our skirmishers drove the enemy's into the works on the main road by a spirited dash, being supported by the divisions of Stanley, of the Fourth Corps, and Johnson, of the Fourteenth Corps, and our lines pressed up at all points, but not near enough to silence the artillery. Late in the evening the Sixteenth Corps, forming the left of the Army of the Tennessee, carried by assault a portion of the rebel line. At daylight on the morning of the 5th of July our skirmishers advanced, only to find the enemy gone, a movement rendered necessary upon their part by the success of the Sixteenth Corps on the evening previous. The next linie of works was found in front of the railroad bridge and the several roads and pontoon bridges, at Pace's, Montgomery's, and Turner's Ferries, forming a very extensive tete-de-pont, which consisted of a system of square redoubts, in defensive relations, connected by infantry parapets, but few of these redoubts
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
ith General Stanley's. The movement commenced at about 11 a. m. The lines were handsomely carried in Stanley's front under a trying artillery fire in addition to the musketry fire from the rifle-pits. Immediately General Stanley moved up his main line and intrenched the position gained. This was within short musketry range of the enemy's continuous works. General Newton took a part of the same line, as also did General Wood at a later hour. During the night the enemy again retreated. July 5, pursuit was continued by my corps along the railroad, General Wood leading. Very little skirmishing until the head of column reached Vining's Station. From this point a road led to the east toward Atlanta, crossing the Chattahoochee River at Pace's Ferry, where the enemy had a pontoon bridge. Wood's skirmishers encountered a brigade of dismounted cavalry, which had its front covered by rail barricades along a ridge at right angles to the abovenamed road, and one-quarter of a mile from th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
July 1, in same position, with heavy skirmish and artillery firing. July 2, late p. m. moved to the left and relieved a portion of General Newton's line. July 3, enemy evacuated, brigade marched via Marietta, and bivouacked in front of enemy, in rear of General Grose's brigade, five miles south of Marietta. July 4, went into position on left of General Grose, pushed forward a strong skirmish line and advanced line of battle; took enemy's skirmish pits and intrenched during the evening. July 5, enemy evacuated, brigade marched to the Chattahoochee River. July 6, 7, 8, and 9, occupied same position. July 10, at 10 a. m. marched on road leading up the river, camped within one mile of pontoon crossing. July 11, occupied same position. July 12, crossed the river and went into position on high bluff one mile below crossing. July 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17, occupied same position. July 18, brigade marched out Atlanta road at 5 a. m., following General Newton's division; camped near Buc
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 22 (search)
e left and relieved the One hundredth Illinois on picket. July 3, moved with the brigade several miles past Marietta. July 4, Captain Patrick, in command of the picket detail, was wounded in advancing the line, causing the loss of his left arm. July 5, moved to Vining's Station, near the Chattahoochee; laid there till the 10th, and were moved to the left. July 12, crossed the river, threw up works on a high ridge near the river, and laid there till the 18th. July 18 and 19, moved with the briithdrew the night of the 5th, and, with the brigade, returned to Atlanta, reaching that place September 8. Recapitulation.-Commissioned officers wounded, 2; enlisted men wounded, 34; killed, 4; missing, 3; aggregate loss during the campaign, 43. The regiment was under the enemy's fire twenty-six consecutive days, from June 10 to July 5, both inclusive. W. T. Chapman, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Regiment. Capt. John A. Wright, A. A. G., First Brig., First Div., Fourth Army Corps.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
les from that place on the Atlanta road strongly intrenched. July 4, celebrated our national anniversary by a charge over a large corn-field, carried the enemrry's outer works, capturing many prisoners, with a loss of 89 killed and wounded in my brigade, and held the position until night, under the cover of which the enemy withdrew four miles to the Chattahoochee River. Captain Hale, brigade officer of the day, of the Seventy-fifth Illinois, one of the best officers in the army, fell here. July 5, pursued the enemy (Wood's division in front) to the river. Continued skirmishing until July 10. Marched five miles up the river. July 12, crossed the Chattahoochee; marched down the left bank. and encamped at Powers' Ferry, in front of the Twenty-third Corps, with our corps. Thirty-sixth Indiana commenced and built while here a trestle bridge over the river, which was completed on the 16th day of July. July 18, moved from Powers' Ferry with corps to near Buck Head, south seven miles
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 30 (search)
arged on the rifle-pits of the enemy, killing and capturing nearly all of the enemy in them. Only one man left the Seventy-fifth skirmish company, and he to conduct to the rear the prisoners. The number of prisoners taken cannot be correctly stated, as little notice was taken of disarmed men or of anything but to obey the orders of the commanding officers. All the ground gained was stubbornly held. The regiment lost 7 wounded, and. Capt. Robert Hale, of Company I, killed. At daylight on July 5 we find the works of the enemy evacuated, and were in readiness to move toward the Chattahoochee River. We go into camp on the right bank at 4 p. m. Here the command rests, only doing picket duty, till the 10th July. One man was wounded on the 7th by a shot from the enemy on the opposite bank. On the 11th of July we move up the river, cross it. On the 12th go into camp, wait orders till 18th of July, when at daylight again ready to march. At 2 a. m. July 19 receive orders from brigade com
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
We encamped for the night. July 4, there was considerable fighting during the day. Our brigade charged over an open field, driving the rebels handsomely, and captured a number of prisoners. We held our lines and constructed works. My regiment built three separate lines of works during the day. Relieved the Fifty-ninth Illinois on the front line just after dark, and worked all night on the works partially constructed by them. Our loss during the day was 1 officer and 9 privates wounded. July 5, the enemy evacuated our front during the night. We followed them closely to the Chattahoochee River, where they again made a stand. We took position on a hill overlooking the river and encamped for the night. July 6, remained in camp all day; nothing transpired in our front. July 7, arranged camp in proper order and prepared for a few days' rest. July 8, still resting quietly in camp; moved about three miles up the river. July 9, 10, and II, remained quietly in camp. July 12, moved a
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
nd to Smyrna, where we found the enemy strongly fortified. On Monday, July 4, at 11 a.,m. we charged the enemy's works, capturing the rifle-pits, with a large number of prisoners, and killing and wounding several of the enemy; our loss was 1 commissioned officer wounded and 1 enlisted man killed, and 17 enlisted men wounded. During the night the enemy fell back to the Chattahoochee River and left us in full possession of their strong works at Smyrna, which we immediately occupied. On Tuesday, July 5, at daybreak we commenced pursuing the enemy. The regiment moved forward to Vining's Station, thence one mile to the left and encamped on the Chattahoochee River. On Wednesday, July 6, the regiment lay in camp, our skirmishers exchanging occasional shots across the river. We lay in this camp until the 10th. On Sunday, July 10, we marched up the river about five miles, where the regiment encamped within about one-half mile of the river, and continued in camp until the 12th. On Tuesd
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
on, which had encountered the enemy there. July 4, moved forward and formed on the left of General Stanley, who had advanced his skirmish and main lines, took some of the enemy's rifle-pits and captured prisoners. The enemy retired this night. July 5, marched, following General Wood, who had a skirmish with the enemy's cavalry near Pace's Ferry, driving them over it. Encamped near Vining's Station, in reserve. July 6, remained in camp. July 7, moved camp, our left resting on Rottenwood Creenched, with open ground for several hundred yards in advance of their position, across which it would have been impossible to advance with any hope of success. From the circumstances of the case my attack was a skirmish fight. September 3, 4, and 5, remained in camp strengthening my position. Left on the night of the 5th for Jonesborough. September 6, remained in camp near Jonesborough. September 7, broke up camp and marched toward Atlanta, second in order, and encamped at Sykes' house. Se
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