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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.53 (search)
l battle till you can concentrate all your forces and get up your reserves and reinforcements; I will push on the troops as fast as they arrive. It would be well to have staff-officers at the Monocacy, to direct the troops arriving where to go, and to see that they are properly fitted out. They should join you by forced marches. Beware of partial combats. Bring up and hurl upon the enemy all your forces, good and bad. Map 21: July 4th. Map 22: July 5th. Map 23: July 6th. Map 24: July 7th. Map 25: July 8th. Map 26: July 9th. Map 27: July 11th. Map 28: July 13th. Map 29: July 14th. Meade, fully alive to the importance of striking Lee before he could cross the Potomac, disregarded this, advanced on the 11th, and on the 12th pushed forward reconnoissances to feel the enemy. After a partial examination made by himself and his chiefs of staff and of engineers, which showed that its flanks could not be turned, and that the line, so far as seen by them, presented no
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Naval operations in the Vicksburg campaign. (search)
rewarded by success, for though she was badly battered, she was neither stopped nor disabled. On the other hand, her shot, penetrating the boiler of the ram Lancaster, used up that vessel and caused considerable loss of life among her crew. The Benton, Davis's flagship, got under way after Brown had passed, and followed him at her usual snail's pace, to borrow Davis's phrase, without overtaking him. In a few minutes the Arkansas was under the guns of Vicksburg. A week before, on the 7th of July, Farragut had written to the department that he hoped soon to have the pleasure of recording the combined attack by army and navy, for which we all so ardently long. In the course of the week that had elapsed these hopes had been pretty well extinguished. The canal had turned out a failure, and the prospect that a considerable force of troops would arrive had been growing every day more remote. Before the Arkansas made her appearance, therefore, Farragut had already been meditating a r
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The capture of Port Hudson. (search)
commander of a courage and firmness that now, as always, rose with the approach of danger, with whom difficulties diminished as they drew near, and whose character had earned the respect of the inhabitants. Still by the 4th of July things were at such a pass that General Emory plainly told General Banks he must choose between Port Hudson and New Orleans. However, Banks was convinced that Port Hudson must be in his hands within three days. His confidence was justified. At last on the 7th of July, when the saphead was within 16 feet of the priest-cap, and a storming party of 1000 volunteers had been organized, led by the intrepid Birge, and all preparations had been made for springing two heavily charged mines, word came from Grant that Vicksburg had surrendered. Instantly an aide was sent to the general-of-the-trenches bearing duplicates in flimsy of a note from the adjutant-general announcing the good news. One of these he was directed to toss into the Confederate lines. Some