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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 507 507 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 20 20 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 14 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 7 7 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 6 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 5 5 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for July 7th or search for July 7th in all documents.

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all affairs in which the 1st Mass. Cavalry took part, especially at Monocacy Ford, near Poolesville, September 5, where one of its companies was sharply attacked by Longstreet's cavalry and had a few killed or wounded and lost some prisoners; Official War Records, XIX (2), 185. but nothing more serious occurred before the opening of the Antietam campaign. Xvi. The Antietam campaign. On July 4, 1862, the President had called for three hundred thousand troops, and Governor Andrew, on July 7, for fifteen thousand. Within two months nine new three-years regiments had been filled (from the 33d to the 41st), besides the 9th and 10th batteries, and some four thousand recruits for old regiments. On August 4 the reverses of McClellan and Banks led to a new call for three hundred thousand nine-months troops, to be raised by draft if necessary; and seventeen Massachusetts militia regiments, numbering more than sixteen thousand men, were called out or enlisted for that term of service.