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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 365 365 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 35 35 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 18 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 14 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 9 9 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 7 7 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for July 9th or search for July 9th in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 7 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
ed to encourage enlistments. The selectmen were directed to make such arrangements as they might judge expedient to procure volunteers to fill the quota of the town. April 8th, The selectmen were authorized to take such action as they may deem proper under the act of the Legislature approved March 28th, 1864; which act allowed money to be raised by taxation to pay bounties to volunteers, but limited the amount to be paid to each volunteer to one hundred and twenty-five dollars. On the 9th of July, the town voted to avail itself of the provisions of this act. August 9th, The selectmen were authorized to pay the bounty prescribed by the act of March 28th, 1864, in gold. 1865. March 6th, Two thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers during the year. May 13th, Voted, to raise by taxation sixty-five hundred dollars, to refund money subscribed and paid by citizens to encourage recruiting. West Stockbridge furnished one hundred and
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
first-rate revolver, if its use will be permitted by the commanding officer; also, to give three dollars a week to each person who will drill one hour on three several days of each week for three months. The adjoining towns of Somerset and Berkley were invited to join with Dighton in raising a military company. Three thousand dollars were appropriated for war purposes. August 10th, Voted, to pay State aid to the families of volunteers, as provided by the act of the Legislature. 1862. July 9th, Voted, to pay each volunteer a bounty of one hundred dollars. August 19th, The bounty was increased to three hundred and twenty-five dollars to three-years volunteers; and on August 28th it was voted to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service. 1863. August 29th, Voted, to pay aid to the families of drafted men. September 23d, Voted, to assess a tax to refund to citizens the money they had individually paid for recruiting purposes, and which amounte
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
H. Haskell, John E. Cowden, John S. Poyen, William C. Burney, Benjamin A. Follensbee, were chosen to act with the selectmen in the expenditure of the money and to encourage recruiting. Immediately after the meeting a company was organized, and commenced drilling. It afterwards formed part of the First Regiment of Heavy Artillery Massachusetts Volunteers. November 5th, The town authorized the selectmen to hire such sums of money as may be needed to aid the families of volunteers. 1862. July 9th, The town voted to pay each volunteer, to the number of forty-one, a bounty of one hundred dollars, who shall enlist for the period of three years and be credited to the quota of the town. The selectmen were instructed to use all diligence to fill the quota of the town without delay, and to employ suitable aid for that purpose. They were also authorized to borrow money for the payment of bounties, and to cooperate with the adjoining town of Salisbury in organizing a new company to be comp
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
the town who may have died in the service of their country. August 21st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for nine months to fill the quota of the town. December 16th, Eight hundred dollars were appropriated to pay State aid to the families of volunteers. 1864. May 23d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer, and to each substitute for a drafted man, who shall be credited to the quota of the town. July 9th, The selectmen were directed to borrow money, sufficient to reimburse to individuals the money subscribed by them to pay bounties, not to exceed one hundred and twenty-five dollars for each volunteer; also, that that amount shall be paid to each volunteer who shall hereafter enlist and be mustered into the United-States service to the credit of the town. 1865. April 2d, Voted, to refund the money contributed by individuals in aid of, and for the purpose of, filling this town's quota.
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
into the hands of his honor, in advance, for disbursement, and the mayor is authorized to draw his warrant for this amount before proceeding on the duty; the same to be charged to the appropriations for Cambridge soldiers and their families. July 9th, A communication was received from the mayor in regard to the new call of the President for more troops, which was referred to a joint committee, which reported as follows:— Whereas a call has been made upon the Governor of Massachusetts by urch. After the sermon each member was presented with a New Testament. May 26th, They attended Rev. Mr. Greenwood's church, and were presented with a silk banner valued at sixty dollars. Previous to leaving town for camp at Lynnfield, on the 9th of July, religious ceremonies were held in the town hall by the different clergymen of Malden. Each of the commissioned officers was presented with a sword, belt, and a revolver, valued at $123.50. The amount of money raised and expended by the t
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
voted that the military committee enlist, and have credited to the town one hundred and twenty-two men, that being the probable quota of the town; also, to appropriate twenty thousand dollars for State aid to the families of volunteers, and other military purposes. Power was given to the military committee and selectmen to pay such bounties to volunteers as they may deem expedient. The town-clerk was authorized to enter upon his records the proceedings of the citizens' meetings held on the 9th and 12th of July. Mr. Williams from the military committee, being called upon, made a verbal report showing that they had enlisted one hundred men, which the committee believed would more than cover the town's quota under both calls. The thanks of the town were then voted to the committee. A committee was appointed to wait upon Colonel Wild, who was then at home on leave, and invite him to be present. On appearing he was warmly greeted. He thanked his fellow-citizens for their warm sympat
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
ow employed in the military service of the Government, and to the wants of their families while absent. June 8th, Voted, to send five dollars to each of the two three-months volunteers then in the service, belonging to Auburn. 1862. July 26th, Nine men having been called for as the quota of the town under a new requisition, it was voted to give each a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars; this was raised to one hundred and seventy-five dollars by private subscription; a committee of one ish any assistance that may be needed by the families of those who shall be called from this town into actual service, and for this purpose to draw orders upon the treasurer from time to time to any amount not exceeding fifteen hundred dollars. July 9th, The selectmen were directed to pay State aid to the families of volunteers not to exceed twelve dollars a month to each family, and to draw orders upon the treasurer for that purpose not to exceed in the aggregate five thousand dollars. 1862