hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 578 578 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 41 41 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 37 37 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 21 21 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 15 15 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 13 13 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 10 10 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 9 9 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for July 10th or search for July 10th in all documents.

Your search returned 41 results in 38 document sections:

1 2 3 4
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
Capt. George W. Cook, One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois Infantry. No. 145Capt. William H. Snodgrass, Twenty-second Indiana Infantry. No. 146Maj. James T. Holmes, Fifty-second Ohio Infantry. No. 147Brig. Gen. Absalom Baird, U. S. Army, commanding Third Division. No. 148Col. Moses B. Walker, Thirty-first Ohio Infantry, commanding First Brigade. No. 149Col. Morton C. Hunter, Eighty-second Indiana Infantry. No. 150Col. William P. Robinson, Twenty-third Missouri Infantry, of operations July 10-September 8. No. 151Lieut. Col. Ogden Street, Eleventh Ohio Infantry, of operations May 7-30. No. 152Col. Durbin Ward, Seventeenth Ohio Infantry. No. 153Lieut. Col. Frederick W. Lister, Thirty-first Ohio Infantry. No. 154Maj. John H. Jolly, Eighty-ninth Ohio Infantry, of operations May 7-June 1. No. 155Col. Caleb H. Carlton, Eighty-ninth Ohio Infantry, of operations June 1-September 8. No. 156Col. Benjamin D. Fearing, Ninety-second Ohio Infantry. No. 157Col. Newell Gleason, Eighty-se
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
safe points of passage over the Chattahoochee above the enemy, with good roads leading to Atlanta, and Johnstonabandoned his tete-depont, burned his bridge, and left us undisputed masters north and west of the Chattahoochee at daylight of the 10th of July. This was one, if not the chief, object of the campaign, viz, the advancement of our lines from the Tennessee to the Chattahoochee; but Atlanta lay before us, only eight miles distant, and was too important a place in the hands of the enemy tennessee, asked permission to command the expedition and received it. As soon as Johnston was well across the Chattahoochee, and as I had begun to maneuver on Atlanta, I gave the requisite notice, and General Rousseau started punctually on the 10th of July. He fulfilled his order and instructions to the very letter, whipping the rebel General Clanton en route. He passed through Talladega and reached the railroad on the 16th, about twentyfive miles west of Opelika, and broke it well up to that
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
nd near to and facing the river. July 6, 7, and 8, remained in position, making an occasional demonstration and feint as if to throw a bridge, with a view to keep as large a force of the enemy on the opposite bank as possible. July 9, in accordance with instructions from department headquarters, General Newton's division was sent to Roswell Factory to support General Garrard's cavalry in effecting a crossing of the Chattahoochee at that point. He crossed and made a bridge-head. July 10, Stanley's and Wood's divisions moved to near the mouth of Soap Creek, in support of General Schofield, who had crossed the river at that point. July 11, at 5 p. m. received orders to secure the heights opposite Powers' Ferry, on the south side of the Chattahoochee, to protect the laying of a bridge at that point. Stanley's division fulfilled these instructions the next morning at daylight, passing the river at Schofield's bridge. July 12, at 3 a. m. received the order from General
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
ved a portion of General Newton's line. July 3, enemy evacuated, brigade marched via Marietta, and bivouacked in front of enemy, in rear of General Grose's brigade, five miles south of Marietta. July 4, went into position on left of General Grose, pushed forward a strong skirmish line and advanced line of battle; took enemy's skirmish pits and intrenched during the evening. July 5, enemy evacuated, brigade marched to the Chattahoochee River. July 6, 7, 8, and 9, occupied same position. July 10, at 10 a. m. marched on road leading up the river, camped within one mile of pontoon crossing. July 11, occupied same position. July 12, crossed the river and went into position on high bluff one mile below crossing. July 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17, occupied same position. July 18, brigade marched out Atlanta road at 5 a. m., following General Newton's division; camped near Buck Head. July 19, marched about three miles and went into position on left of division. July 20, marched in rear o
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 26 (search)
roops on our left failing to advance, left us exposed to a galling flank fire, but the men unflinchingly held their ground until relieved by a portion of the Forty-fifth Ohio. I cannot speak too highly of the conduct of my officers and men on this occasion. Our total loss in the action, which lasted one hour and a half, was 4 enlisted men killed, and 6 wounded. On the following day we followed the retreating enemy to a point near the Chattahoochee River, where we remained in reserve until July 10, when with our division the regiment moved to the left, and on July 12 crossed the river, occupying a position in front of the Twenty-third Corps. We remained here until July 18, when the regiment was ordered to report to the corps supply train for duty. Nothing of importance transpired while with the train. On the 30th of August the regiment was relieved from duty with the train and ordered to report immediately to the brigade. Reported to the brigade on the sae day; found the troops
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
rsary by a charge over a large corn-field, carried the enemrry's outer works, capturing many prisoners, with a loss of 89 killed and wounded in my brigade, and held the position until night, under the cover of which the enemy withdrew four miles to the Chattahoochee River. Captain Hale, brigade officer of the day, of the Seventy-fifth Illinois, one of the best officers in the army, fell here. July 5, pursued the enemy (Wood's division in front) to the river. Continued skirmishing until July 10. Marched five miles up the river. July 12, crossed the Chattahoochee; marched down the left bank. and encamped at Powers' Ferry, in front of the Twenty-third Corps, with our corps. Thirty-sixth Indiana commenced and built while here a trestle bridge over the river, which was completed on the 16th day of July. July 18, moved from Powers' Ferry with corps to near Buck Head, south seven miles. July 19, advanced across Peach Tree Creek, Seventy-fifth Illinois in advance. Skirmished and dro
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 30 (search)
s taken cannot be correctly stated, as little notice was taken of disarmed men or of anything but to obey the orders of the commanding officers. All the ground gained was stubbornly held. The regiment lost 7 wounded, and. Capt. Robert Hale, of Company I, killed. At daylight on July 5 we find the works of the enemy evacuated, and were in readiness to move toward the Chattahoochee River. We go into camp on the right bank at 4 p. m. Here the command rests, only doing picket duty, till the 10th July. One man was wounded on the 7th by a shot from the enemy on the opposite bank. On the 11th of July we move up the river, cross it. On the 12th go into camp, wait orders till 18th of July, when at daylight again ready to march. At 2 a. m. July 19 receive orders from brigade commander to move out as a reconnoitering party on the Decatur road as far as Peach Tree Creek. Two companies were sent in advance of the column. They reached the creek at about 9 a. m., and placed two sentinels on th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
ing the day was 1 officer and 9 privates wounded. July 5, the enemy evacuated our front during the night. We followed them closely to the Chattahoochee River, where they again made a stand. We took position on a hill overlooking the river and encamped for the night. July 6, remained in camp all day; nothing transpired in our front. July 7, arranged camp in proper order and prepared for a few days' rest. July 8, still resting quietly in camp; moved about three miles up the river. July 9, 10, and II, remained quietly in camp. July 12, moved across and some two miles down the Chattahoochee River, and again went into camp, our right resting on the river and running at right angles with it. Built a line of log works in front of the regiment. July 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17, lay quietly in camp in same position. July 18, left camp at 6 a. m. and marched five miles in a southeasterly direction, when we encamped for the night. July 19, marched to Peach Tree Creek, about three miles, ove
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
ing the night the enemy fell back to the Chattahoochee River and left us in full possession of their strong works at Smyrna, which we immediately occupied. On Tuesday, July 5, at daybreak we commenced pursuing the enemy. The regiment moved forward to Vining's Station, thence one mile to the left and encamped on the Chattahoochee River. On Wednesday, July 6, the regiment lay in camp, our skirmishers exchanging occasional shots across the river. We lay in this camp until the 10th. On Sunday, July 10, we marched up the river about five miles, where the regiment encamped within about one-half mile of the river, and continued in camp until the 12th. On Tuesday, July 12, we marched early, crossed the Chattahoochee on canvas pontoons, and moved down the river some distance, to a high bluff overlooking the river, where we encamped until the 18th. On Monday, July 18, the regiment moved forward toward Atlanta six miles, and encamped. On Tuesday, July 19, we marched at 11 a.m. about thre
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
o had a skirmish with the enemy's cavalry near Pace's Ferry, driving them over it. Encamped near Vining's Station, in reserve. July 6, remained in camp. July 7, moved camp, our left resting on Rottenwood Creek. July 8, remained in camp. July 9, marched to Roswell to support Garrard's cavalry and occupy any ground they had gained after crossing the river. Crossed the river about dusk at Shallow Ford and relieved the cavalry, who recrossed to the north side, except their picket in front. July 10, adjusted our lines and made a t~te-de-pont. General Dodge, with two divisions of the Sixteenth Corps, arrived to-day and relieved our front line. July 11, recrossed the river and went into camp on hills near Shallow Ford. July 12, moved back to our old camp at Rottenwood Creek. July 13, crossed the river at Powers' Ferry, and formed on the left of General Wood. Remained in this position till the 18th. July 18, moved to Buck Head, my division in advance. Encountered the enemy's cavalry
1 2 3 4