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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 578 578 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 41 41 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 37 37 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 21 21 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 15 15 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 13 13 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 10 10 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 9 9 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for July 10th or search for July 10th in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
lowing is an extract from my official report to the War Department upon this important event in the siege of Charleston: At 5 o'clock on the morning of the 10th of July the enemy's attack commenced by a heavy fire on our position from a great number of light guns, apparently placed during the preceding forty-eight hours in thend and all the troops on it knew that the enemy was preparing to make one front Little Folly. I knew it as well. The real cause of the Federal success on the 10th of July was the insufficiency of our infantry force on Morris Island, let alone the fact that I could not, for want of necessary labor, complete the battery already read no cause to regret it. He was held in check there, and never got in until we finally opened the gate ourselves toward the end of the war. On the evening of July 10th detachments from various Georgia regiments which I had called for began to arrive. I pressed the War Department for Clingman's brigade. Part of it came on the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing land forces at Charleston, S. C. (search)
ames C. Carmichael; 25th Ohio, Capt. Nathaniel Haughton; 75th Ohio, Col. A. L. Harris. Recapitulation of Union losses, July 10th-Sept. 7th:  Killed.Wounded.Captured or Missing.Total. Morris Island, July 101591 106 Battery Wagner, July 11491231July 101591 106 Battery Wagner, July 1149123167339 Battery Wagner, July 182468803891515 Siege operations, July 18-Sept. 7712789358 Total on Morris Island38113725652318 The effective strength of the land forces employed in the direct operations against Charleston, ranged from 11,000 to . Tabb. General Beauregard, in his official report, says: The total loss in killed and wounded on Morris Island from July 10th to Sept. 7th was only 641 men; and deducting the killed and wounded due to the landing on July 11th and 18th, the killerom 30 to 300 pounds, only three men were killed and 49 wounded. The entire loss ins the defenses of Charleston from July 10th to September 7th was 157 killed, 674 wounded,--and 159 captured or missing = 990. (See Official records, Vol. XXVIII.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. (search)
vicinity of Atlanta, and express no confidence that you can defeat or repel him, you are hereby relieved from the command of the Army and Department of Tennessee, which you will immediately turn over to General Hood. S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General. Orders transferring the command of the army I have two reports of the strength of the army besides that of April 30th, already given: 1. Of July 1st, 39,746 infantry, 3855 artillery, and 10,484 cavalry,--total, 54,085. 2. Of July 10th, 36,901 infantry, 3755 artillery, and 10,270 cavalry,--total, 50,926.--J. E. J. to General Hood were written and published immediately, and next morning I replied to the telegram of the Secretary of War: Your dispatch of yesterday received and obeyed — command of the Army and Department of Tennessee has been transferred to General Hood. As to the alleged cause of my removal, I assert that Sherman's army is much stronger, compared with that of Tennessee, than Grant's compared with that
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate strength in the Atlanta campaign. (search)
s line. In a foot-note [p. 274] General Johnston says: I have two reports of the strength of the army besides that of April 30th, already given: 1. Of July 1st, 39,746 infantry, 3855 artillery, and 10,484 cavalry,--total, 54,085. 2. Of July 10th, 36,901 infantry, 3755 artillery, and 10,270 cavalry,--total, 50,926. The return of July 1st shows present for duty, all arms, officers and men, 64,578, instead of 54,085. (As in case of the return of April 30th, General Johnston gives onlSmith joined the army about June 20th near Kenesaw, making its available force on that line nearly 70,000 men. [G. W. Smith, p. 334, says the militia were 2000, which would reduce Major Dawes's total to about 67,000.--editors.] The return of July 10th gives the present for duty 60,032, instead of 50,926, the loss since July 1st being 1377 deserters, 526 dead, two regiments sent to Savannah, and prisoners and wounded. This with the Georgia militia (increased to about 9000 [G. W. Smith says 5
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
; 24th Ill., Relieved for muster-out June 9th, June 28th, and June 10th, respectively. Capt. August Mauff; 82d Ind., Col. Morton C. Hunter; 23d Mo., Joined July 10th. Col. William P. Robinson; 11th Ohio, Relieved for muster-out June 9th, June 28th, and June 10th, respectively. Lieut.-Col. Ogden Street; 17th Ohio, Col. DurbK. Scott, Lieut.-Col. Greenberry F. Wiles: 20th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. John C. Fry, Maj. Francis M. Shaklee; 32d Ohio, (transferred to First Brigade, Fourth Division, July 10th), Col. Benjamin F. Potts, Capt. William M. Morris, Lieut.-Col. Jeff. J. Hibbets; 68th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. George E. Welles; 78th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. G. F. Wiles, Maj3 co's), Capt. Daniel McLennon, Capt. Pleasant T. Matches, Lieut. Lewis T. Linnell, Lieut. D. W. Wilson; 12th Wis. (transferred to First Brigade, Third Division, July 10th), Col. George E. Bryant, Lieut.-Col. James K. Proudfit. Second Brigade (at Allatoona, Kenesaw, Ackworth, and other points in rear from June 8th), Col. George C.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 10.78 (search)
to this battle, I can but attribute my escape from utter annihilation to the incapacity of my opponent. The battle of Winchester, or of the Opequon, as General Sheridan calls it, was fought September 19th. The strength of Early's infantry August 31st, exclusive of Kershaw (who was not engaged at Winchester), as shown by the abstract from monthly returns, was as follows: Present for duty, 1076 officers and 9570 men,--aggregate present for duty, 10,646. Fitz Lee's (cavalry) strength on July 10th was 115 officers and 1591 men; but it had probably been decreased by over two months of hard service, and General Early's Memoir gives its number of mounted men on September 19th as about 1200, and also the mounted men of Lomax as about 1700. To the artillery are ascribed on September 10th, in the best available returns, 39 officers and 818 men. Taking the official figures for the infantry, General Early's figures for the cavalry, and the indicated returns for the artillery, the total pre
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Petersburg and Richmond: December 31st, 1864. (search)
: S. C. Battery (Hart's), Lieut. E. L. Halsey; Va. Battery, Capt. Edward Graham; Va. Battery, Capt. William M. McGregor. Richmond and Danville defenses, Brig.-Gen. J. A. Walker. [Consisted mainly of several battalions of Virginia Reserves, second-class militia, and small detachments of cavalry and artillery.] The following exhibit of Lee's strength at Richmond and Petersburg is compiled from official returns: date.Cavalry.Artillery. Infantry.Total. June 30th7421552041,81054,751 July 10th8962556942,56657,097 August 31st6739363124,30734,677 September 10th7110497623,00235,088 October 31st5654505736,59647,307 November 30th6208614444,07256,424 December 20th6438545654,63966,533 In the return for June 30th the strength of Dearing's cavalry (estimated at 1800) is not included, and the return for November 30th indicates that 1290 of the cavalry were dismounted. The numbers given above are the present for duty on June 30th, July 10th, September 10th, and December 20th, an