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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 3: closing of Southern ports.--increase of the Navy.--list of vessels and their stations.--purchased vessels.--vessels constructing, etc. (search)
llowing table: Names. Where. Ordered to be prepared for sea service with dispatch. Put in commission, or ready for officers and crew. Sailed. Frigates--   1861. 1861. 1861.   Potomac New York April 27 July 30 Sept. 10   St. Lawrence Philadelphia April 20 Late in May. June 29   Santee Portsmouth, N. H April 17 May 27 June 20 Sloops--           Savannah New York April 1 June 1 July 10   Jamestown Philadelphia April 9 May 18 June 8   Vincennes Boston April 9 June 24 July 12   Marion Portsmouth April 20 June 30 July 14   Dale Portsmouth April 20 June 30 July 17   Preble Boston April 20 June 22 July 11 Brigs--           Bainbridge Boston April 20 May 1 May 21   Perry New York April 20 May 1 May 14 Steamers--           Roanoke New York April 20 June 20 June 25   Colorado Boston April 20 June 3 June 18   Minnesota Boston April 3 May 2 May 8   Wabash New York April 9 April 29 May 30   Pensacola Washington  
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
nd children who happened to be on board. Quite a large force of Confederates were assembled in that quarter, considering themselves secure from the attacks of the gun-boats, the distance by water from Vicksburg being so great: the route being first to the mouth of the Red River, then up the Black and Tensas, both narrow streams, to Tensas Lake and Bayou Macon. The guerillas fancied they could carry on their raids with impunity. So when Selfridge appeared with his little flotilla on the 12th of July, they were taken by surprise. As soon as the gun-boats hove in sight the enemy's transports, of which there were here quite a number, made their escape among the intricate water-ways with which that region abounds, and where for want of pilots they could not be immediately followed. Selfridge now divided his forces, sending the Manitou and Rattler up the Little Red River, a small tributary of the Black, and the Forest Rose and Petrel up the Tensas. The night was dark and rainy and th