Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for July 12th or search for July 12th in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
ly 11th; at which it was recommended to pay each volunteer for three years service a bounty of one hundred dollars. The following resolution, among others, was adopted:— Resolved, That our old men contribute of their substance, and our healthy young men tender their services; remembering that, if in ancient times for a good man some would even dare to die, surely for the necessary support of a righteous cause there should be no hesitancy because life would be attended with hazard. July 12th, The resolutions of the citizens' meeting were adopted by the city government, and the mayor was directed to make arrangements for enlisting men. Another citizens' meeting was held on the 14th of August, at which it was resolved, that the patriotism of Massachusetts will sustain the Government in putting down this Rebellion at any cost of men and money. It was also voted to raise, by subscription, money sufficient to add one hundred dollars to each volunteer's bounty. A resolution was pa
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 5: Dukes County. (search)
which the town voted to authorize the selectmen to act according to the law of the Commonwealth, in regard to the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers who have enlisted in the military service of the United States. 1862. A special town-meeting was held on the 14th of June, at which the selectmen were directed to pay State aid to the families of volunteers, or to those who are dependent on them for support, as they may think proper. Another special meeting was held on the 12th of July, when the following vote was passed:— Voted, To pay the sum of one hundred dollars to each of the first four volunteers, or, in case of no volunteers, the same sum to be paid to each of the first four persons hereafter drafted, provided such persons shall pass the necessary examination before the authorized officer. These were men for three years service. At a town-meeting held on the 26th of August, it was— Voted, To raise six hundred dollars for each three-years volunteer,
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
volunteers. September 19th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow $6,392.86, to carry out the provisions of the 9th section of the act passed by the Legislature for the reimbursements of bounties paid to volunteers. 1864. March 7th, The assessors were directed to abate the taxes of such volunteers absent in the army as they may think proper. June 29th, Fifteen hundred dollars were appropriated to reimburse citizens for money expended by them in filling the quota of the town in 1863. July 12th, A similar vote was passed in favor of those who had advanced money to obtain volunteers in 1864. Twenty-five hundred dollars were appropriated to pay bounties to volunteers who shall enlist to the credit of the town before the 1st of March, 1865. Five hundred dollars were voted to the families of two drafted men. 1865. January 21st, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist to fill the quota of the town under
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
. Noble, A. J. Forward. The town-clerk during all the years of the war was C. J. Root. The town-treasurer during the years 1861 and 1862 was Heaton Granger; in 1863, Herman Laflin; in 1864 and 1865, S. L. Granger. 1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider questions relating to the war, was held November 26th, at which it was voted to raise three hundred dollars to pay State aid to the families of soldiers living in the town, as provided by the act of the Legislature. 1862. July 12th, Voted, to raise sixteen hundred dollars, to be expended under the direction of the selectmen for the same purpose; and five hundred dollars were directed to be paid for the benefit of the families or parents of volunteers belonging to the town who may have died in the service of their country. August 21st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for nine months to fill the quota of the town. December 16th, Eight hundred dollars were appropriated
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
State law; also to volunteers who have enlisted and gone from the city. March 25th, Twenty-five thousand dollars were appropriated for State aid to soldiers' families. July 17th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the city; on the 22d ten dollars additional were added. The quota of three-years men required of Lowell under this call was three hundred and ninety-seven. A public meeting was held July 12, which was addressed by the mayor, the adjutant-general of the State, and many prominent citizens of Lowell. The men were soon obtained. Lowell claims to have been the first city to have furnished its quota. August 18th, Forty thousand dollars were appropriated for aid to families of soldiers, and a bounty of fifty dollars was authorized to be paid to each volunteer for nine months service. 1863. March 17th, Sixty thousand dollars were appropriated for aid to soldiers' families. July
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 11: Nantucket County. (search)
cLean, Henry Colesworth, Jr., Reuben P. Folger; in 1865, Joseph Mitchell, 2d, Robert McLean, William H. Waitt, Joseph C. Chase, Charles H. Jagger, Henry Colesworth, Charles A. Leader. The town-clerk during all the years of the war was William Cobb. The town-treasurer in 1861 was Andrew Whitney; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, Samuel Swain. 1861. No official action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this year. 1862. On the 12th of July a legal town-meeting was held to take action in regard to filling the quota of the town under the late call of the President for volunteers, at which the selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who should enlist in the military service for three years and be credited to the quota of the town. Another meeting was held on the 1st of September, when it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer for nine months serv
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
the military committee enlist, and have credited to the town one hundred and twenty-two men, that being the probable quota of the town; also, to appropriate twenty thousand dollars for State aid to the families of volunteers, and other military purposes. Power was given to the military committee and selectmen to pay such bounties to volunteers as they may deem expedient. The town-clerk was authorized to enter upon his records the proceedings of the citizens' meetings held on the 9th and 12th of July. Mr. Williams from the military committee, being called upon, made a verbal report showing that they had enlisted one hundred men, which the committee believed would more than cover the town's quota under both calls. The thanks of the town were then voted to the committee. A committee was appointed to wait upon Colonel Wild, who was then at home on leave, and invite him to be present. On appearing he was warmly greeted. He thanked his fellow-citizens for their warm sympathies. The me
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
een dollars a month, and to assist the families of such soldiers and officers as may need assistance. A thousand dollars were also appropriated to pay to each member of the company fifty cents for every half day he may be engaged in drilling. July 12th, Voted, to appropriate eight hundred dollars to uniform a volunteer company now forming in the town. 1862. July 17th, Voted, that the treasurer be directed to pay, under the order of the selectmen, to each and every inhabitant who shall haveommittee was appointed to carry the votes of the town into effect, and the selectmen were authorized to borrow a sum not exceeding five thousand dollars. The town-clerk was directed to send a copy of the votes to the town-clerk of Phillipston. July 12th, The town voted to pay State aid to the families of volunteers as provided by an act of the Legislature. 1862. April 7th, The selectmen were authorized to pay transportation upon articles sent from the town to the seat of war for hospital pu