Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for July 15th or search for July 15th in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
der the direction of the mayor and a committee of the city council. Ten thousand dollars were appropriated for the formation of a Home and Coast Guard. The American flag was ordered to be displayed from the City Hall until otherwise ordered. July 15th, A report was received, showing that Fort Phenix in Fairhaven, and Fort Taber in New Bedford, mounting eleven guns, had been manned by the Home Guard, and recommending an additional appropriation to maintain the same; and on the 29th of July fizens who shall be mustered into the service of the United States. April 9th, Five hundred dollars were authorized to be expended on the enlistment of a company of heavy artillery, which on the 21st of May was increased to one thousand dollars. July 15th, A watchman was discharged for using seditious language. July 30th, State aid was directed to be paid to the families of drafted men. Ordered, that the bells be rung and a salute fired on the day of the Public Thanksgiving on the 6th of August
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
years, when mustered into the military service and credited to the quota of the town. Another meeting was held on the 15th of July, and the selectmen were directed to pay the same amount of bounty to whoever shall furnish a recruit or substitute, whereavement; that these resolutions be entered upon the city records, and a copy sent to the family of the deceased. July 15th, The bounty to each volunteer for three years service was fixed at one hundred dollars, and twenty thousand dollars werfamilies. March 17th, Three thousand dollars additional were voted for aid to the soldiers' families during the year. July 15th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each inhabitant who shall volunteer for three years servicethe Governor; the payment to commence when the soldier went into camp. 1862. A special town-meeting was held on the 15th of July, at which it was voted to pay a bounty of seventy-five dollars to each volunteer, to the number of fifteen, who would
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
dollars for bounty money advanced by them. June 25th, Four thousand dollars were appropriated to procure volunteers to fill the quota of the town in anticipation of any call of the President for more men. November 8th, The town bounty was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so continued until the end of the war. Each volunteer was furnished by citizens with from two to twenty-five dollars for immediate use, in addition to his bounty before leaving for the front. 1865. July 15th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to reimburse various individuals who have advanced money to procure volunteers. Orange furnished two hundred and nine men for the war, which was a surplus of ten over and above all demands. Three were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was twenty-five thousand one hundred and thirty-five dollars ($25,135.00). The amount of money raised an
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
aid to volunteers. 1864. April 4th, Five hundred dollars were appropriated for aid to soldiers' families. Two thousand two hundred and sixty dollars were raised for reimbursement of money paid by citizens to volunteers since Oct. 17, 1863. July 15th, The bounty to be paid volunteers was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so remained until the end of the war. 1865. April 3d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to refund to individuals the amounts of money they hariate money, and to call out the militia of the town for drill, if they think it expedient. November 5th, The town voted to authorize the selectmen to pay State aid to the families of volunteers, as provided by act of the Legislature. 1862. July 15th, Voted, to respond to the call of the Governor for seven volunteers to fill the quota of the town; to raise seven hundred dollars to aid the family of each volunteer who may enlist to the credit of the town; and also to pay a bounty of one hund
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
ate of said company, in case he should be called into active service; and a further sum of thirteen hundred dollars was placed at the disposal of the committee. It was also voted that ten dollars a month be paid to each citizen of the town who has joined or may join a military company while in service, and ten dollars a month additional to the support of his family. It was also voted to place five thousand dollars in the hands of the selectmen to carry the last vote into effect. 1862. July 15th, It was voted to appropriate one hundred and twenty-five dollars for each volunteer to make up the town's quota of forty men; that five thousand dollars be raised by a tax on property, and that the poll-tax payers have the privilege of paying to the committee such sums as they see fit. This was in fact a voluntary tax. The treasurer was required to keep a correct account of all sums thus raised, and the tax-bill was to be made out separate and distinct from the usual legal tax-bill, and h
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
f the money. They were given power to pay the town-allowance to the families instead of to the volunteers, if they thought it best. 1862. April 7th, The town authorities were authorized to borrow ten thousand dollars for military purposes. July 15th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who enlists for three years and is credited to the town on or before the 15th of August next. The treasurer was authorized to borrow fourteen thousand dollars to pay the same. Tetionary power to expend the same. April 22d, The mayor announced that he had received two hundred dollars from two individuals in aid of the soldiers. Several physicians tendered their professional services gratuitous to soldiers' families. July 15th, The committee on the military fund were directed to pay aid to soldiers' families as provided by law; they were also directed to make suitable provision for the sick and wounded soldiers, and for the burial of the dead. 1862. February 24th, T