Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for July 18th or search for July 18th in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
newall Jackson and Bee's brigades supported and fought with our guns. During the heaviest of the conflict, when shell and bullet were falling thickest, General Beauregard and staff dashed down the line of battle, and reaching our position, halted and said, Colonel Walton, do you see the enemy? Yes. Then hold this position and the day is ours. Three cheers for Louisiana! The boys cheered heartily, and voice after voice caught up the cheer along the line. Thus, in the two engagements of July 18 and 21 the trial was met and successfully. And now came another trial, that of life in camp; sometimes more irksome to the true soldier than fighting, and yet not without its pleasures, which, however, are perhaps enjoyed more now in retrospection than was the reality at the time. The second company, under Rosser and Slocomb, had also won their spurs at Munson's Hill and Lewinsville, under the dashing J. E. B. Stuart; and then came the long winter in huts on the banks of Bull Run. Me
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
newall Jackson and Bee's brigades supported and fought with our guns. During the heaviest of the conflict, when shell and bullet were falling thickest, General Beauregard and staff dashed down the line of battle, and reaching our position, halted and said, Colonel Walton, do you see the enemy? Yes. Then hold this position and the day is ours. Three cheers for Louisiana! The boys cheered heartily, and voice after voice caught up the cheer along the line. Thus, in the two engagements of July 18 and 21 the trial was met and successfully. And now came another trial, that of life in camp; sometimes more irksome to the true soldier than fighting, and yet not without its pleasures, which, however, are perhaps enjoyed more now in retrospection than was the reality at the time. The second company, under Rosser and Slocomb, had also won their spurs at Munson's Hill and Lewinsville, under the dashing J. E. B. Stuart; and then came the long winter in huts on the banks of Bull Run. Me