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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 332 332 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 48 48 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 40 40 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 9 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 6 6 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 6 6 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 20, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 6 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 6 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 5 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for July 19th or search for July 19th in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
comes, may you find yourself as happy as you are now. I speak of your next with no common interest, because I hope and believe you will keep it with us. Oh, a happy gathering will we have! Mrs. C. wrote April 30, 1838:— I never meet any of your friends, dear Sumner, that you are not enthusiastically remembered. In all the pleasant meetings where you were seen, we think of the friend who once welcomed us, too. Surely, your right ear must burn very hot sometimes. Felton wrote, July 19 (his wedding-day):— There are not many men in this wide world to whom I should write on my wedding-day. . . . You have heard of the dinner Cleveland gave the Five of clubs. We drank your health in full bumpers, and had a superb time, I assure you. Longfellow and I returned to Cambridge at ten, and agreed that the day must be noted with white chalk. . . . Excuse this rambling, my dear Charley, and take my writing at all as a proof of the warm affection with which I regard you. Aga