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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 631 631 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 69 69 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 39 39 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 20 20 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 19 19 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 19 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 16 16 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 15 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 13 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for July 22nd or search for July 22nd in all documents.

Your search returned 39 results in 12 document sections:

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
citizens' meetings were held in Chatham during this year, at which action both by word and deed was taken to place the town in its true position as regards the war; but no formal town-meeting was called, as none was necessary. 1862. On the 22d of July a legal town-meeting was held, at which it was voted to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer who would enlist for three years military service, when mustered in and credited to the quota of the town; also to pay, to assist thevery sea. Other votes were passed having for their object home defence, which the exposed position of the town appeared to render desirable. A committee of six were also appointed to assist in recruiting. 1862. At a meeting held on the 22d of July, it was voted to raise sixteen hundred dollars, by taxation, to pay bounties to persons who have become volunteer soldiers of the United States; also to raise and pay to volunteers having families in Provincetown a sum of money, in addition to
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
sense a charity, but what of right belongs to families of volunteers. 1862. A regular town-meeting was held on the 22d of July, at which it was voted that one hundred dollars be paid from the town treasury to each person who shall enlist under t capacity, in relation to the war during this year. 1862. The first meeting to act upon war matters was held on the 22d of July; at which five hundred dollars were appropriated to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each of five men who would 3d of March, five hundred dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers. On the 22d of July the town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each of eighteen men who would volunteer for three years in td allowances to the wives, children, and parents of volunteers, as is allowed by the laws of this Commonwealth. 1862. July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of the town. A
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
11th (in the mean time the company had been raised). It was voted that the company raised have the use of the town hall for drilling, but not to be used on Sunday evenings. On the 22d of May another adjourned meeting was held, but nothing of especial interest or importance was done. On the 5th of November a meeting was held, at which it was voted to pay State aid to the families of volunteers in such sums as will be refunded by the State. 1862. A special town-meeting was held on the 22d of July, which voted to raise by taxation one hundred and twenty-five dollars bounty to each volunteer, when sworn in and accepted. Another meeting was held August 14th (when the separation had taken place), at which the town voted to pay a bounty of four hundred dollars to each volunteer who would enlist for three years, when mustered in and credited to the quota of the town; also, a gratuity of three hundred dollars to each man who may be drafted, accepted, and credited to the quota of the tow
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 5: Dukes County. (search)
volunteer a bounty of five hundred dollars, and the inhabitants of Tisbury to have until the 27th inst. to come forward and fill the quota, which if not then filled, the committee shall procure the men elsewhere; and the committee were to make this their special duty, and receive a reasonable compensation. It was also voted that, if a man enlists in the town, and is rejected by the examining officer, his expenses shall be paid by the town. 1863. A special town-meeting was held on the 22d of July, at which the treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay the treasurer of the Commonwealth, as provided in the act to provide for the reimbursements of bounties paid volunteers. 1864. Several meetings were held during this year, to devise ways and means to procure volunteers, and provide for the payment of State aid to their families; also, to repay those citizens for money which they had advanced, to assist in filling the quota of the town. By the return made by the selectmen
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
month's Government pay, to compensate him for time spent in drilling. 1862. July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each inhabitant of the town ver amount of money might be necessary for the payment of State aid. On the 22d of July the town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who and estates of the town at such time as the selectmen may think best. 1862. July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteo borrow, not exceeding five thousand dollars, for aid to soldiers' families. July 22d, Voted, to pay to each volunteer for three years service (to the number of tweay each soldier twenty dollars a month while in the military service. 1862. July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteto borrow two thousand dollars for aid to soldiers' families during the year. July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer (to
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
g appears to have been held during this year, to act upon matters relating to the war. 1862. July 22d, A meeting was held, at which Dr. William Dwight presented resolutions which were adopted. The that the selectmen pay all volunteers' families State aid who, in their opinion, are in want. July 22d, A railroad bridge at Greenfield having been burned, a report was circulated that it was set on March 3d, One thousand dollars were appropriated for State aid to the families of volunteers. July 22d, On notion of Hon. George T. Davis, it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each861. No action was taken by the town in relation to the war during this year. 1862. On the 22d of July a town-meeting was held, at which it was voted to pay each volunteer who should enlist in theuthorized to borrow, not exceeding three hundred dollars, for State aid to soldiers' families. July 22d, A committee of two was chosen to aid the selectmen in recruiting volunteers, and to pay a boun
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
The selectmen were authorized to borrow money for that purpose. October 4th, The treasurer was directed to pay back to the several collectors all moneys paid in by them as bounty money for the town's first quota of three hundred thousand men, and that the town treasurer be authorized to borrow six hundred dollars to pay equally to each of the six volunteers. 1863. April 25th, The town voted to raise seventeen hundred and fifty dollars for the payment of bounties to volunteers. 1864. July 22d, The selectmen and treasurer were authorized to borrow money to refund to each man who has paid commutation or has furnished a substitute, or who may pay it under the last two calls of the president for men, one hundred and twenty-five dollars; also, to borrow fifteen hundred dollars to aid, when needed, to procure volunteers to fill the quota of the town under any future call of the President, by paying a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars, the same amount to be paid to each per
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
eventh Regiment. All of these organizations were in the nine months service. July 22d, Voted, to pay State aid to the families of men who may be drafted. The thank and town aid that is paid to the families of three-years volunteers. 1863. July 22d, Voted, unanimously, that the families of citizens or of aliens living in Hollin the expenditure of the money appropriated at the previous meeting. 1862. July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for three yeaober 7th, Voted, to give all needful aid to the families of soldiers. 1862. July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunte the town hall with lights was given to the military free of expense. 1862. July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each of the party in whose name it is made, and the attorney by whom it is instituted. July 22, Voted, to pay State aid to the families of volunteers as provided by law, and
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
re appropriated to purchase rifles for a new company raised in the town; ample provision was made for the support and comfort of the soldiers' families. 1862. July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to twenty-four three-years men who would enlist to the quota of the town. A series of patriotic rhree months service. October 8th, The selectmen were instructed to comply with the act passed by the Legislature in regard to the payment of State aid. 1862. July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer when mustered into the military service for three years and credited to the quota of the town; te in the service of the United States, such a sum as shall make his pay, including that received of the Federal Government, twenty-five dollars a month. 1862. July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years, within fifteen days, and be mustered in and credited
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
. 1862. At the annual town-meeting held on the 3d of March, the selectmen were directed to pay the volunteers belonging to Marshfield whatever amount may be due them under the vote passed May 1, 1861. A special town-meeting was held on the 22d of July, at which Nathaniel H. Whiting, Esq., presented the following resolutions, which being read were unanimously adopted:— Resolved, That in the dark and troubled night which is upon us we cherish with a deeper love and more exalted patriotismnd to assist their families. Benjamin Kingman, George W. Bryant, H. W. Robinson, William F. Brett, and Jonathan White were chosen to act with the selectmen in the expenditure of the money, which the treasurer was authorized to borrow. On the 22d of July an additional five thousand dollars were voted for the same general objects. 1862. March 10th, The town voted to pay the families of volunteers such sums as the selectmen may order. David L. Cowell, Esq., presented a series of patriotic re
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