Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for July 25th or search for July 25th in all documents.

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ters, army of Potomac, Manassas, July 23, 1861. Colonel:--Mr. George Johnson, special agent of the Quartermaster's Department, is sent to Loudon county for the purpose of collecting wagons, teams, and grain forage for the use of this army. It is expected that he will have no difficulties whatsoever; that the loyal citizens of your rich county will be glad to have an opportunity thus to furnish supplies for our army, which has so gloriously maintained the independence and sovereignty of Virginia, and driven back in ignominious flight the invaders of her soil. But, at the same time, all classes of your citizens must contribute their quota; therefore, if necessary, it is expected that constraint must be employed with all who are forgetful of their obligations. By order of General Beauregard. Respectfully, Colonel, your obedient servant, Thomas Jordan, A. A. Adjutant General. To Colonel A. T. M. Rust, Commandant Militia, Loudon county. --Leesburg Washingtonian, July 25.
Doc. 118.-Charleston Presbytery. Meeting at Columbia, S. C., July 25. At the meeting of the Charleston Presbytery, the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted: Whereas, The relations of the State of South Carolina, of ten other adjacent States, and of the people thereof, with the other States and people previously composing the United States of America, have been dissolved, and the former united in the separate and independent Government of the Confederate States of America, thereby making a separate and independent organization of the Church within the said Confederate States desirable and necessary, in order to the more faithful and successful fulfilment of its duty to its Divine Lord and Master; And whereas, The General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, by the adoption of a paper known as Dr. Spring's Resolutions, ignoring the establishment of the Government of the Confederate States of America, and disregardin
Doc. 123.-proclamation of Gov. Morgan. The Governor of New York issued the following proclamation: The President of the United States having requested me to furnish additional troops for the prompt suppression of resistance to the constitution and the laws, I do hereby call for a volunteer force of 25,000 men to serve for three years or during the war. Such force will be raised pursuant to a general order, which will be issued immediately, and which will prescribe the mode of organization. To the end that every portion of the State may have an opportunity to contribute thereto, the rendezvous will be at New York, Albany, and Elmira, the Headquarters at Albany. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the privy seal of the State, at the city of Albany, this twenty-fifth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one. Edwin D. Morgan. By order of the Governor. Lockwood L. Doty, Private Secretary.
Doc. 125 1/2.-message of Governor Pettus. The Mississipppi Legislature convened at Jacksonville on the 25th of July. The Nashville papers of the 28th give the following extracts of the Governor's Message:-- It affords me pleasure to announce to you that the revolution which you inaugurated last fall has so far been prosperous and successful. The people of this State have united in approving your action and sustaining the Confederate Government, with a unanimity which surpasses the expectations of the most sanguine. The call to arms has been responded to in a manner unknown in modern times, and the call for means to support our volunteers is now being answered with such liberal devotion to the cause as to gratify the heart of the patriot, and convince both friends and foes that Mississippi is determined to make this a successful struggle against Northern tyranny, if the united efforts of all classes, ages, sex, and conditions of our people can accomplish it. To enab
Total,223721292 Secession official reports. General Price's report. Headquarters Missouri State Guard, Springfield, August 12, 1861. To His Excellency, Claiborne F. Jackson, Governor of the State of Missouri: I have the honor to submit to your Excellency the following report of the operations of the army under my command, at and immediately preceding the battle of Springfield. I began to move my command from its encampment on Cowskin Prairie, in McDonald County, on the 25th of July, toward Cassville, in Barry County, at which place it had been agreed between Gens. McCulloch, Pearce, and myself, that our respective forces, together with those of Brig.-Gen. McBride, should be concentrated, preparatory to a forward movement. We reached Cassville on Sunday, the 28th of July, and on the next day effected a junction with the armies of Gens. McCulloch and Pearce. The combined armies were then put under marching orders, and the First Division, Gen. McCulloch commanding,
Secession official reports. General Price's report. Headquarters Missouri State Guard, Springfield, August 12, 1861. To His Excellency, Claiborne F. Jackson, Governor of the State of Missouri: I have the honor to submit to your Excellency the following report of the operations of the army under my command, at and immediately preceding the battle of Springfield. I began to move my command from its encampment on Cowskin Prairie, in McDonald County, on the 25th of July, toward Cassville, in Barry County, at which place it had been agreed between Gens. McCulloch, Pearce, and myself, that our respective forces, together with those of Brig.-Gen. McBride, should be concentrated, preparatory to a forward movement. We reached Cassville on Sunday, the 28th of July, and on the next day effected a junction with the armies of Gens. McCulloch and Pearce. The combined armies were then put under marching orders, and the First Division, Gen. McCulloch commanding, left Cassville on t