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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 201 201 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 135 135 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 25 25 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 21 21 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 17 17 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 12 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for July 26th or search for July 26th in all documents.

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and thus covered up, of course, rendering it out of the question for an inquiring relative to recognize and reclaim a corpse. Recently the gentleman above referred to passed the cemetery, and, seeing the brutal work going on, asked: Is that the way Virginia disposes of the soldiers of the Confederacy? Has she not got soil enough to furnish them each with separate, distinct burial? The man in charge replied: Is it any of your business You attend to your own business, and I will attend to mine. Surely, the man who dies in defence of his country is entitled to an honored grave beneath its soil. If the authorities will not look to the matter the personal friends of the deceased should. We understand that the burial of deceased soldiers is in the hands of a parcel of German undertakers, instead of being vouchsafed to the respectable undertakers of the city, who, from a regard for the cause, would discharge the duty at least with decency and humanity.--Richmond Examiner, July 26.
Jackson, Miss., July 24.--Lieut-Col. Ferguson, of Starke's cavalry, with two companies and a field battery, has captured and destroyed a Federal mail steamer at Skipwith's Landing, eighty miles above Vicksburgh. Col. Ferguson succeeded in obtaining possession of the mail-bag from the ship Richmond, en route for Washington. The contents are highly interesting. Yankee letters admit the impossibility of capturing Vicksburgh without an immense land force, and admit that the Arkansas whipped them. They evince great terror of the Arkansas. Her appearance round the bend this morning was the signal for a general stampede. The bombarding continued slowly to-day.--Richmond Examiner, July 26.
Knoxville, July 24.--Col. John H. Morgan sends by special courier to the headquarters of Tennessee, a despatch dated Georgetown, Ky., nineteenth instant. He states that he had taken eleven cities and towns, with a very heavy amount of army stores, and that he has a force sufficient to hold all the country outside of Lexington and Frankfort, which places are ch<*>y garrisoned by home guards.--Petersburgh Express, July 26.
Richmond, July 26.--A few nights ago, at the great Union meeting in New-York, Dr. Francis Lieber, a renegade from his adopted State, South-Carolina, made a flaming speech, calling for the subjugation of the South. Two weeks before, his son, Charles Lieber, a brave confederate soldier, fell by a Yankee bullet, while charging a Yankee battery. His remains were sent to South-Carolina.--Richmond Dispatch, July 26. Richmond, July 26.--A few nights ago, at the great Union meeting in New-York, Dr. Francis Lieber, a renegade from his adopted State, South-Carolina, made a flaming speech, calling for the subjugation of the South. Two weeks before, his son, Charles Lieber, a brave confederate soldier, fell by a Yankee bullet, while charging a Yankee battery. His remains were sent to South-Carolina.--Richmond Dispatch, July 26.