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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 201 201 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 135 135 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 25 25 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 21 21 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 17 17 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 12 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 6 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for July 26th or search for July 26th in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
nd every thing was done which the occasion required. Of these citizens' meetings no record appears to have been preserved, or, if there were, we have failed to obtain a copy of it, which we much regret. 1862. A special town-meeting was held July 26th, to act upon war matters; at which a committee of six gentlemen were appointed to act with the selectmen in recruiting volunteers to fill the quota required of the town, under the call of the President for three hundred thousand men for three ye selectmen were authorized to borrow one thousand dollars for war purposes. 1862. April 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who enlists in the military service for three years, and is credited to the town. July 26th, The bounty was raised to two hundred dollars, and the selectmen were directed to fill the quota of the town as soon as possible. August 19th, Voted, to pay volunteers for nine months service a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars, which, o
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
nd vicinity. The selectmen were also directed to take charge of the arms and equipments now on their way from the Adjutant-General, that they may be properly kept and returned when demanded. June 15th, The selectmen were directed to pay State aid to the families of volunteers, as provided by the laws of the Commonwealth. 1862. April 7th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow, not exceeding one thousand dollars, for the payment of State aid to the soldiers' families during the year. July 26th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for three years, when mustered into the military service, and credited to the quota of the town. The selectmen were authorized to immediately open a recruiting-office, and to borrow money to pay the bounties. August 25th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, and to borrow money to pay the same. 1863. August 1st, The selectmen were directed to pay State a
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
quota of volunteers during this year. 1864. April 18th, The town voted to refund to the contributors three-fourths of the money paid by them to assist in filling the quotas of the town, of volunteers for military service, under the calls of the President of October, 1863, and February, 1864; also, to raise by taxation ten thousand dollars for recruiting expenses, and the payment of bounties to volunteers to fill the quota of Easton, under the recent calls of the President for more men. July 26th, Voted, to raise money by taxation, and to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist to fill the quota of the town, under the call of the President dated July 18, 1864. 1835. June 17th, Voted, to refund all money contributed by individuals during 1864, in aid of recruiting men to fill the quota of the town, provided the claim shall be presented in writing to the selectmen before the first day of January next; and persons who have served one
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
shall be paid for drilling; also voted, to transfer the duties of the committee chosen at the last meeting to the selectmen. 1862. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer, to the number of twenty-one, who shall enlist from this town for three years, said bounty to be paid upon the production of satisfactory evidence of enlistment and mustering in as above; voted, that the payment of the above bounty be limited to those who enlist in the month of July. July 26th, Voted, to authorize the selectmen to pay fifty dollars, in addition to the amount previously voted, to all residents that have, or may, volunteer from this town previous to the 1st of August next. The following resolution was also passed, and recorded upon the town records:— Resolved, That we have learned with pain and sadness of the privations and sufferings of our soldiers in the late battles before Richmond, especially those who went from our midst; that they all deserve our deepe
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
ct of the Legislature. 1862. March 3d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to provide for the comfort of the soldiers' families living in the town. July 26th, Voted, to appropriate four hundred dollars for the sick and wounded soldiers. September 11th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer to amend the vote passed at the meeting in May in regard to support of the families of volunteers so as to conform to the law passed by the Legislature. 1862. July 26th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of the town; and the selectmen were authorized to borrow seventeen hundr. November 5th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow five thousand dollars for the payment of State aid to soldiers' families, as provided by law. 1862. July 26th, The selectmen were directed to canvass the town for volunteers, and to pay each volunteer for three years service a bounty of one hundred dollars, and fifty dol
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
United-States Government, and to that end are ready to respond to the demand of the legally constituted authorities of Massachusetts and the United States in the performance of every loyal and patriotic duty. 1862. At a meeting held on the 26th of July, the selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer, to the number of thirty-six, who shall enlist for three years in the military service, and be credited to the quota of the town. At another meeting held as held on the 27th of May; at which it was voted to pay State aid to the families of soldiers living in Wilbraham, as provided by law. 1862. April 7th, The town-treasurer was authorized to borrow money in aid of the families of volunteers. July 26th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for three years service, when mustered in and credited to the quota of the town, the number not to exceed twenty. The treasurer was authorized to borrow tw
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
ed to be paid to each volunteer who should enlist for three years, and be mustered in to the credit of the town; and the selectmen were authorized to draw warrants upon the treasurer in favor of the Executive Committee to pay the same. 1862. July 26th, Voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each of twelve volunteers who shall enlist for three years and be mustered in to fill the quota of the town. August 3d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each nine-monthA citizens' meeting was held, at which it was voted to pay each volunteer for three years service, when mustered in and credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of one hundred dollars, which vote was ratified at a legal meeting held on the 26th of July, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money sufficient to pay the same. It was also— Resolved, That we pledge ourselves to furnish our share of the three hundred thousand men called for and apportioned to this town, and to furnish m
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
years of the war was Libni Parker. 1861. No legal town-meeting to act upon matters connected with the war appears to have been held during this year. 1862. July 26th, The town-treasurer was authorized to borrow (if necessary) five hundred dollars, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each of the five volunteers for threef the President, and had a surplus of thirteen. July 18th, Lowell was required to furnish six hundred and twenty-seven men under a recent call of the President. July 26th, Voted, to pay each volunteer for three years service, when mustered in and credited to the quota of the city, a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars iny service, and be credited to the quota of the town. David L. Webster, Rev. Gilbert Haven, and thirty others were chosen to assist the selectmen in recruiting. July 26th, A citizens' meeting was held, at which upwards of twenty-seven hundred dollars were subscribed by inhabitants of the town to encourage recruiting. A. D. Lamson
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
teers. November 7th, Two thousand dollars were appropriated for aid to soldiers' families and for recruiting expenses. 1864. August 4th, The bounty for each volunteer who should enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the town was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so continued until the end of the war. 1865. April 3d, Two thousand dollars were appropriated for payment of money expended the past year in raising volunteers to fill the quota of the town. July 26th, The selectmen were authorized to examine and allow all claims of individuals who had contributed money, or procured substitutes, to fill the quota of the town, provided that parties aggrieved shall have the right to appeal to the town. Walpole furnished about two hundred and twenty-six men for the war, and had a surplus of eighteen over and above all demands. One was a commissioned officer. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusi
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
fil any contract heretofore made with members of the volunteer militia belonging to that town who were called into the service of the United States. October 5th, Voted, to pay State aid to the families of volunteers as provided by law. 1862. July 26th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow forty-five hundred dollars, and the selectmen to open a recruiting office, and to pay each volunteer who enlists for three years and is credited to the quota of the town a bounty of one hundred dollars. Alating to the war was held on the 18th of May, at which it was voted to pay all persons, inhabitants of Kingston, who have enlisted or may enlist in the military service of the country six dollars a month while in said service. 1862. On the 26th of July it was voted to pay each volunteer who shall enlist for three years service and be credited to the quota of the town a bounty of one hundred dollars. The number of men required was twenty. Captain William S. Adams offered to furnish the money
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