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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 201 201 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 135 135 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 25 25 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 21 21 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 17 17 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 12 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 6 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac. You can also browse the collection for July 26th or search for July 26th in all documents.

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William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 12 (search)
that if the crest of the ridge behind the fort, and distant from it by only four hundred yards, could be carried, it would secure the most important results, carrying with it Petersburg, and probably a large part of the enemy's artillery and infantry. Meade's testimony.—Ibid., p. 126. About the time fixed for the assault, which was the morning of the 30th of July, there happened a conjuncture of events that promised a happy bearing on the result. Four days before —that is, on the 26th of July—an expeditionary force under General Hancock, consisting of the Second Corps with two divisions of Sheridan's cavalry, had been sent to operate towards Richmond by the north side of the James. Hancock crossed at Deep Bottom on the night of the 26th, with instructions to proceed rapidly to Chapin's Bluff, where Lee had established ponton-bridges, that were his means of communication between the two parts of his army. Hancock was to prevent Confederate re-enforcements from being sent to t<