Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for July 27th or search for July 27th in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
mmand of the Fourth Army Corps. Brig. Gen. Alpheus S. Williams, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker in temporary command of the Twentieth Army Corps. July 27-31, 1864.McCook's raid on the Atlanta and West Point and Macon and Western Railroads, with skirmishes near Campbellton (28th), near Lovejoy's Station (29th), at Clear Creek (30th), and action near Newnan (30th). Garrard's raid to South River, with skirmishes at Snapfinger Creek (27th), Flat Rock Bridge and Lithonia (28th). July 27-Aug. 6, 1864.Stoneman's raid to Macon, with combats at Macon and Clinton (July 30), Hillsborough (July 30-31), Mulberry Creek and Jug Tavern (August 3). July 30, 1864.Maj. Gen. Henry W. Slocum, U. S. Army, assigned to the command of the Twentieth Army Corps. Aug. 7, 1864.Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. John M. Palmer in temporary command of the Fourteenth Army Corps. Aug. 9, 1864.Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, assigned to the command of the F
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
erations September 1-2. No. 11Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard, U. S. Army, commanding Fourth Army Corps, of operations May 1-July 27. No. 12Maj. Gen. David S. Stanley, U. S. Army, commanding Fourth Army Corps, of operations July 27-September 8. No. 13July 27-September 8. No. 13Surg. J. Theodore Heard, U. S. Army, Medical Director. No. 14Maj. Gen. David S. Stanley, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations May 3-July 26. No. 15Brig. Gen. Nathan Kimball, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations Auguanding Third Brigade. No. 24Col. P. Sidney Post, Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry, commanding Third Brigade, of operations July 27-August 7. No. 25Col. John E. Bennett, Seventy-fifth Illinois Infantry, commanding Third Brigade, of operations Septembeade, of operations August 19-September 8. No. 63Col. P. Sidney Post, Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry, of operations May 3-July 27. No. 64Capt. Samuel West, Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry, of operations August 24-September 8. No. 65Lieut. Col. Robert
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
th me, even if there had been time. Upon a report of the facts to General Sherman, he ordered the cavalry division of General McCook to clear the ground at daybreak next morning, July 26, which was done, the bridge constructed, and (communication established between the cavalry forces on the south bank of the river with those on the north bank. The new line to be occupied by our left flank, upon the withdrawal of the Army of the Tennessee, having been completed by the morning of the 27th of July, the movement of that command toward our right flank commenced, and at the same time the movement of the cavalry forces began; that passing around the enemny's left flank being under the command of General McCook, and that around his right flank under Generals Stonemnan and Garrard, the balance of our army meanwhile pressing forward and gaining ground as rapidly as possible. This was continued on the 28th of July, when, at about noon, a furious attack was made upon the Army of the Tennes
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
s, for the most part, placed in such a position as to bring a fire upon the enemy's works or the city beyond. During the day a terrific battle occurred between the enemy and the Army of the Tennessee on the extreme left. Meanwhile, in accordance with instructions received, I held my command in momentary readiness to move. July 23, 24, 25, and 26, my corps remained substantially in the same position, having completed a system of works strong enough to be held by a thin single line. July 27, in obedience to orders from Major-General Sherman, I took leave of the Fourth Army Corps and assumed command of the Army of the Tennessee. In conclusion I wish to say that it pains me not to be able to give a substantial reward to officers who have so faithfully, so energetically, and unselfishly co-operated with me during our prolonged and arduous campaign. I leave the gallant officers and soldiers in the hands of division, brigade, and regimental commanders for honorable mention, wi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 16 (search)
No. 12. report of Maj. Gen. David S. Stanley, U. S. Army, commanding Fourth Army Corps, of operations July 27-September 8. headquarters Fourth Army Corps, Atlanta, Ga., September 15, 1864. I have the honor to report that upon the morning of the 27th of July General Howard, commanding Fourth Army Corps, turned the command over to me, and left the same morning to take command of the Army of the Tennessee. The corps was at this time occupying a line of works confronting the fortificat27th of July General Howard, commanding Fourth Army Corps, turned the command over to me, and left the same morning to take command of the Army of the Tennessee. The corps was at this time occupying a line of works confronting the fortifications of Atlanta, extending from a quarter of a mile northwest of the Buck Head road to the neighborhood of what was known as the Howard house, General Newton holding the right, Wood the center, and the First (my old) Division, now commanded by Colonel Grose, the left. During the 27th the position was strengthened, and batteries were put in to play upon Atlanta. On the 28th we were directed to make a strong demonstration against the enemy and, if possible, carry a point of his line. This was d
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
owing General Newton's division; camped near Buck Head. July 19, marched about three miles and went into position on left of division. July 20, marched in rear of division, crossed south fork Peach Tree Creel, and bivouacked in rear of Colonel Taylor's lines. July 21, occupied same position. July 22, marched in pursuit of enemy; went into position in front of enemy at 10 a. m., and advanced skirmish line. July 23, 24, 25, and 26, occupied same position, building works and skirmishing. July 27, at 9 p. m. moved to left flank of army and occupied enemy's old works. July 28, 29, 30, and 31, occupied same position. August 1 in the evening relieved one brigade of General Hascall's division on the front line. August 2, occupied same position. August 3, made demonstration with skirmish line; lost 8 men wounded. August 4. same position. August 5, made demonstration with skirmish line. August 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11, all quiet. August 12, advanced skirmish line 300 or 400 yards,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
, taking 43 prisoners. July 21, advanced my lines, fortified, and skirmished all day. At night the enemy retreated. July 22, pursued the enemy at 3 a. m.; came upon him in his fortifications at sunrise in front of Atlanta, Ga., on the north two miles from the center of the city. Took position. The balance of the division came up on the left, Wood's division on the right. Here we intrenched, skirmished with the enemy daily, took up his picket-line twice, capturing the most of them, until July 27, Major-General Stanley being assigned to command the corps, I came in and assumed command of the division. August 5, relieved of command of the division and assigned as brigadier to the command of the brigade again. On this day, by orders from corps headquarters, the brigade attempted an assault on the enemy's lines and lost 36 men. Among them was the brave Captain Walker, of the Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania, and the gallant young officer, Lieutenant Willard, Thirty-sixth Indiana. August
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 28 (search)
No. 24. report of Col. P. Sidney Post, Fifty-ninth Illinois Infantry, commanding Third brigade, of operations July 27-August 7. Hdqrs. Third Brig., First DIv., 4TH Army Corps, Atlanta, Ga,., September 15, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit a report of the operations of the Third Brigade, First Division, Fourth Army Corps, while under my command, from the 27th day of July to the 7th of August, 1864: The brigade consisted of the following regiments: Eighty-fourth Regiment Il27th day of July to the 7th of August, 1864: The brigade consisted of the following regiments: Eighty-fourth Regiment Illinois Infantry, commanded by Colonel Waters; Seventyfifth Regiment Illinois Infantry, commanded by Colonel Bennett; Ninth Regiment Indiana Veteran Infantry, commanded by Colonel Suman ; Seventy-seventh Regiment Pennsylvania Veteran Infantry, commanded by Colonel Rose; Thirtieth Regiment Indiana Veteran Infantry, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Hurd; Thirty-sixth Regiment Indiana Infantry, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Carey; Fifty-ninth Regiment Illinois Veteran Infantry, commanded by Lieuten
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 31 (search)
tured some prisoners. At dark I built line of works on front line under fire. On 21st advanced my right wing and built works, and at night cut down timber in front. Advanced at daylight of the 22d, the enemy having fallen back. Came within view of Atlanta, and found the enemy. I was then placed in reserve. On 23d, 24th, and 25th remained in reserve. On 26th was moved by General Grose to the front line, the Thirty-sixth Indiana on my right, and Thirtieth Indiana on my left. From 27th of July to the 19th of August, inclusive, remained in trenches, some men being wounded occasionally by artillery or on the skirmish line during that time. On 20th, at 3.30 a. m., by direction of General Grose, I followed the Ninth Indiana around to the left, crossed Atlanta and Augusta Railroad, where our skirmishers met the enemy's pickets, and we were ordered to their support. Marched in line, connecting my right with the Ninth Indiana, and occupying old works, held them, losing 2 men wounded
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
tenant Drullinger. Built two lines of works. July 21, occupied the position gained yesterday, but moved forward some distance in the forenoon and built another line of works, which we held during the day. July 22, the enemy evacuated our front during the night. Our brigade started in pursuit at 4 a. m., capturing 15 of the enemy. Found them in force within three miles of Atlanta. Formed in line and built works. July 23, occupied the position we fortified yesterday. July 24, 25, 26, and 27, remained in our position. Strengthened our fortifications. No fighting of importance in our front. July 28, 29, 30, and 31, things remained unchanged in our front. August 1 and 2, nothing of importance occurred on our front during the last two days. August 3, our skirmish line was advanced this afternoon, charging that of the enemy and capturing 30 prisoners, but they massed their forces and compelled ours to fall back. Our loss slight. August 4, all quiet in our front to-day. Augus
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