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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 40: (search)
ught away. In these expeditions the gun-boats were constantly exposed to the attacks of Confederate artillery, which was continually on the alert to get a shot at them. So active were the enemy, that, about the middle of July, they constructed a battery mounting 20-pounder Sawyer guns on Malvern Hill, and for a time interrupted the navigation of the James River. The Confederates were, in fact, untiring in their efforts to make the Federal troops and gun-boats uncomfortable. On the 28th of July the enemy commenced the erection of batteries at Four Mile Creek, where they had assembled a large force for the purpose of covering the men at work in the trenches, and making a demonstration against General Foster's front. The gun-boats were brought into requisition. and the Agawam, Commander A. C. Rhind, and the Mendota, Commander E. T. Nichols, shelled the enemy's works for some time, rendering very effective service in connection with General Hancock's military operations. The f
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
s cruisers, and his sailors were somewhat uneasy at their proximity to a British ship-of-war, as a search might have taken place for deserters; but they need not have troubled themselves, for the English were in full sympathy with the Alabama, as was evidenced by their not stopping to inquire into the fate of those on board the burning vessel. The Alabama now continued on her way towards the Cape of Good Hope, capturing and destroying on the passage the ship Express, of Boston. On the 28th of July Semmes anchored in Saldanha Bay. not venturing to Cape Town until he had ascertained that the coast was clear of American vessels-of-war. Every ship that had touched at the Cape had brought intelligence of the wonderful doings of the Alabama, and Semmes in his journal remarks: Mr. Seward and Mr. Adams, Earl Russell and the London Times, have made the British pirate famous. At Saldanha Bay Semmes received every civility from the people, who appeared to be nearly as barbarous as the ab
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
g table will exhibit the work done by the fleet from July 18th to September 8th: Date. 1863. Object. Vessels engaged. July 18. Assault on Wagner Montauk, Ironsides, Catskill, Nantucket, Weehawken, Patapsco, Paul Jones, Ottawa, Seneca, Chippewa, Wissahickon. July 22. Wagner Nantucket, Ottawa. July 24. Wagner (to cover advance.) Weehawken, Ironsides, Catskill, Montauk, Patapsco. Nantucket, Ottawa, Dai Ching, Paul Jones, Seneca. July 25. Wagner Ottawa, Dai Ching, Paul Jones. July 28. Wagner Weehawken, Catskill, Ottawa. July 29. Wagner Ironsides, Patapsco. July 30. Wagner Ironsides, Catskill, Patapsco, Ottawa. July 31. Batteries on Morris Island Ottawa. Aug. 1. Wagner Montauk, Patapsco, Catskill, Weehawken, Passaic, Nahant, Marblehead. Aug. 2. Wagner Ottawa. Marblehead. Aug. 4. Wagner Montauk, Marblehead. Aug. 6. Wagner Marblehead. Aug. 8. Wagner Ottawa, Mahaska, Marblehead. Aug. 11. Wagner and vicinity Patapsco, Catskill. Aug. 13. Morris I