Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for July 28th or search for July 28th in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
57. Valuation in 1860, $226,795; in 1865, $219,948. The selectmen during the years 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, were Zara Higgins, Prince S. Harding, Jonathan Snow. The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Herman Doane. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was Herman Doane; in 1865, Josiah M. Cole. 1861. There does not appear to have been any action taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this year. 1862. On the 28th of July a special town-meeting was held, to take measures to fill the quota of the town under the recent call of the President for three hundred thousand three-years men; at which it was voted to authorize the payment of a bounty of two hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer who would enlist and be credited to the town. The selectmen were authorized to borrow one thousand dollars to pay the same. An enlistment paper was opened at the meeting, and four young men of Eastham immediately enrol
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
f May; at which it was voted to authorize the selectmen to borrow or raise money sufficient to carry out the provisions of the recent act of the Legislature in relation to the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers. 1862. On the 28th of July a special meeting was held, to consider the best means to fill the quota of the town under the late call of the President for three hundred thousand volunteers for three years service. The selectmen were authorized to pay each volunteer who ecertain sum, not to exceed eight hundred dollars to each man called for, as part of the fund for procuring volunteers or substitutes to fill the quota of the town under the anticipated call of the President. Another meeting was held on the 28th of July, when David C. Smith and Wells Laflin were appointed a committee to go to Springfield, and try to get the names from the list. The selectmen in their return in 1866 claim that Dalton furnished eighty-one men for the war; but as the town fil
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
ly 29th, What remained of the five thousand dollars was appropriated to pay State aid to the families of soldiers. 1862. March 3d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay State aid to the families of volunteers during the year. July 28th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and seventy-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years, and be credited to the quota of the town. Hon. John Rogers offered to give each man twenty-five dollars in addition. August 25dall were chosen to enlist volunteers. At a meeting held on the 12th of August, five hundred dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid, in accordance with an act of the Legislature. 1862. A special town-meeting was held on the 28th of July, at which it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years, and be credited to the town; and, if said quota is filled by September 1st, an additional twenty-five dollars.
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
1862. March 3d, The State aid to the families of volunteers was continued. July 28th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enll soon wave in triumph over a regenerated Union, inhabited only by freemen. July 28th, Eleven thousand two hundred and fifty dollars were appropriated to furnish tmay enlist, and in aid of their families living in the town. 1862. On the 28th of July the town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each voluappropriated to pay State aid to soldiers' families during the year. 1864. July 28th, The town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to eacbursement of the money which the treasurer was authorized to borrow. 1862. July 28th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall en be paid to any one enlisting to the credit of the town in the army or navy. July 28th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow twenty-seven hundred and fifty dollar
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
city, during this year in regard to the war. 1862. March 10th, Voted, to raise one hundred dollars for aid to soldiers' families. April 7th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow, not exceeding four hundred dollars, for the same purpose. July 28th, Voted, to raise five hundred and twenty-five dollars to pay bounties to volunteers, and to drafted men if there should be any. The treasurer was authorized to borrow the money. Discretionary power was given to the selectmen to pay aid to solded to borrow money to pay the same. 1863. April 6th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay State aid to the families of soldiers living in that town, provided that the funds of the town are not sufficient for the same. 1864. July 28th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow, not exceeding eight thousand dollars, to be called a recruiting fund, and to be used to procure men to fill the quota of the town under the recent call of the President for more men, it having been repor
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
N. F. Orcutt, Charles Harlow, John C. Reed; in 1865, L. J. Orcutt, L. E. Dawes, C. M. Tillson. The town-clerk during all these years was Almon Mitchell. The town-treasurer during the same period was William Packard. 1861. The first town-meeting at which action was taken in regard to the war was held August 31st, which voted to raise five hundred dollars in aid of families of such citizens as had or might hereafter volunteer in the United-States service. 1862. A meeting was held July 28th, at which it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer to fill the quota of the town, the number required being fourteen. Almon Mitchell who had been town-clerk since 1855, and all through the war, writes, that the above were the first actions of the town after the war commenced. We had many subsequent meetings at which various appropriations were made. There was no unusual incident in our community during the war. I believe we may claim a full average share o
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
, of a volunteer belonging to the town, in addition to the State aid allowed by law. 1862. July 28th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer who enlists for three years i-treasurer be authorized to borrow not exceeding seventeen hundred and fifty dollars. 1862. July 28th, On motion of C. L. Tarbell, voted, that eighteen hundred dollars be raised to pay nine men whge themselves either to enlist or furnish substitutes. Nineteen gentlemen signed the pledge. July 28th, A legal town-meeting was held, which confirmed the proceedings of the citizens' meeting. A bnlisted in the Thirteenth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers for three years service. 1862. July 28th, Voted, to pay each volunteer who shall enlist in the military service for three years, and bed four other citizens were given discretionary power in the expenditure of the money. 1862. July 28th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enl
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
Sawin, Henry Horton; in 1862, Calvin Richards, Jesse Newell, John Battelle; in 1863, Abner L. Smith, Benjamin N. Sawin, Charles A. Bigelow; in 1864, Abner L. Smith, Charles A. Bigelow, Linus Bliss. The town-clerk all through the war was Abner L. Smith. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863 was Sherman Battell; in 1864 and 1865, Hiram W. Jones. 1861. November 5th, The town voted to pay the families of the soldiers in the service from Dover the aid allowed by the State law. 1862. July 28th, Messrs. Ephraim Wilson, John Q. A. Nichols, Asa Talbot, Clement Bartlett, Benjamin N. Sawin, were chosen a committee to aid the selectmen in procuring recruits to fill the quota of the town; also, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for three years, who shall enlist to the credit of the town within twenty days; also, voted to pay State aid to the families of soldiers, and to authorize the treasurer to borrow the money. September 1st, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hun
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
fisheries; therefore few town-meetings were held to act upon matters relating to the war, the main object of the people being to keep their quotas full. 1862. July 28th, An agent was appointed to enlist recruits for three years service, and to pay each a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars. The treasurer was authorized to boe selectmen were authorized to pay the same amount of bounty to each volunteer for three years military service. 1863. At a special town-meeting held on the 28th of July, the selectmen were directed to loan to each inhabitant of Marshfield who may be drafted into the military service, or who may procure a substitute, one hundreg, not to exceed three days in a week for four weeks, and when the company is called into service each volunteer is to receive a month's pay in advance. 1862. July 28th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer, to the number of fifty-six, who shall enlist for three years and be credited to
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 14: Suffolk County. (search)
h of April, 1862. Colonel Wells had command of the expedition, and he felt that as the Chelsea boys had the honor of the exploit, and had also its fearful cost, so the city should retain possession of this memento. Yours truly, Frank B. Fay, Mayor. July 10th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow not exceeding eighteen thousand dollars for the payment of bounties of seventy-five dollars to volunteers to fill the quota of Chelsea under the recent call of the President for more men. July 28th, The bounty to volunteers was increased to one hundred dollars, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow the additional sum of six thousand dollars to meet the demand. July 31st, The payment of one hundred dollars bounty was limited to those who should enlist before the 15th of August next. September 15th, A special meeting was held to consider the resolution passed at a citizens' meeting on Saturday evening last, recommending the payment of a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volu
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