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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: Newport 1879-1882; aet. 60-63 (search)
, etc., lasted through the day and evening, and in the intervals between addresses she was still retouching her poem, which came last of all. A great day! says the Journal. July 23. Very busy all day. Rainy weather. In the evening I had a mock meeting, with burlesque papers, etc. I lectured on Ism-Is-not-m, on Asm-spasm-plasm. July 24. Working hard, as usual. Marionettes at home in the evening. Laura had written the text. Maud was Julius Caesar; Flossy, Cassius; Daisy, Brutus. July 28. Read my lecture on Modern Society in the Hillside Chapel at Concord. ... The comments of Messrs. Alcott and W. H. Channing were quite enough to turn a sober head. To the poorhouse and to Jacob Chase's with Joseph Coggeshall. Old Elsteth, whom I remember these many years, died a few weeks ago. One of the pauper women who has been there a long time told me that Elsteth cried out that she was going to Heaven, and that she gave her, as a last gift, a red handkerchief. Mrs. Anna Brown, who
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
a fine house, and, besides his own paintings of which we saw a number, a wonderful collection of pictures, mostly modern French, Troyon, Corot, Rousseau, Daubigny. Some good things by a Roman artist, Mancini, whom Mesdag praised highly -he is very poor, but has some excellent qualities. A picture of a little girl reclining on a pillow with a few flowers in her hand, pleased me very much — he also praised it. Much fine tapestry, china, etc., etc. He was gruffly pleasant and hospitable. July 28. Antwerp. Visited Cathedral and Musee. Saw my picture, Rubens's Elevation of the Cross, but felt that my eyesight has dimmed since I last saw it. Found Felu, the armless artist, in the Musee copying a picture of Godiva. He was very glad to see us. Much talk with him about Flemish art. A little ramble after dinner and a nibble at a bric-a-brac shop, which, however, did not become a bite. July 31. Cologne. A great concourse of people awaited the arrival of a steamer with the Arion Musi
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 8: divers good causes 1890-1896; aet. 71-77 (search)
realize how far from well I have been for days past. July 27. Woke with an aching head.... Prayed that even in suffering I might still have work and worship. Alliteration is, I know, one of my weaknesses. I thought afterwards of a third W-, work, worship, welcome. These three words will do for a motto of the life which I now lead, in which these words stand for my ruling objects, welcome denoting hospitality in which I should be glad to be more forward than I have been of late.... July 28. Reading Mr. Hedge's review of Historic Christianity to-day, I felt puzzled by his showing of the usefulness of human errors and delusion in the great order of Providence. Lying down for my midday rest, it became more clear to me that there is truth of sentiment and also intellectual truth. In Dr. Hedge's view, the inevitable mistakes of human intellect in its early unfolding were helpful to the development of true sentiment. Higher than this, however, must be the agreement of the two, p