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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
iles and went into position on left of division. July 20, marched in rear of division, crossed south fork Peach Tree Creel, and bivouacked in rear of Colonel Taylor's lines. July 21, occupied same position. July 22, marched in pursuit of enemy; went into position in front of enemy at 10 a. m., and advanced skirmish line. July 23, 24, 25, and 26, occupied same position, building works and skirmishing. July 27, at 9 p. m. moved to left flank of army and occupied enemy's old works. July 28, 29, 30, and 31, occupied same position. August 1 in the evening relieved one brigade of General Hascall's division on the front line. August 2, occupied same position. August 3, made demonstration with skirmish line; lost 8 men wounded. August 4. same position. August 5, made demonstration with skirmish line. August 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11, all quiet. August 12, advanced skirmish line 300 or 400 yards, met very little resistance, and returned to old position. August 13, 14, and 15, occupi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
ome distance in the forenoon and built another line of works, which we held during the day. July 22, the enemy evacuated our front during the night. Our brigade started in pursuit at 4 a. m., capturing 15 of the enemy. Found them in force within three miles of Atlanta. Formed in line and built works. July 23, occupied the position we fortified yesterday. July 24, 25, 26, and 27, remained in our position. Strengthened our fortifications. No fighting of importance in our front. July 28, 29, 30, and 31, things remained unchanged in our front. August 1 and 2, nothing of importance occurred on our front during the last two days. August 3, our skirmish line was advanced this afternoon, charging that of the enemy and capturing 30 prisoners, but they massed their forces and compelled ours to fall back. Our loss slight. August 4, all quiet in our front to-day. August 5, skirmishers advanced and tried to drive in or capture the rebel skirmish line, but failed. No loss in regimen
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 56 (search)
ing up breastworks. July 23, changed position farther to the right of Peach Tree Creek road and constructed strong breastworks. From the 24th day of July to the 24th day of August, inclusive, occupied nearly the same position, strengthening works, doing picket duty, &c. August 25, the grand flanking movement commencing, the regiment marched all night to our right. August 26, continued the movement began last night until 4 p. m., when the regiment bivouacked for the night. August 27, 28, 29, 30, and 31, were occupied in trying to get possession of the Macon railroad between Rough and Ready Station and Jonesborough. September 1, struck the railroad three miles below Rough and Ready Station, and assisted in tearing up and burning the track between that point and Jonesborough. The Army of the Tennessee having engaged the enemy at the latter place early in the day and gained advantage over him, the Fourth Army Corps was ordered to its assistance, but arrived too late in the day to
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 77 (search)
up heavy traverses at the right of each company. We remained inactive until the 28th of July, nothing of interest occurring with the exception of the furious cannonading of the enemy, which was continued daily. About 4 p. m. of July 28 I was ordered by Colonel Knefler to take my regiment and the Seventy-ninth Indiana and advance and support the skirmish line. We advanced, capturing the enemy's rifle-pits without loss, and after turning them for the use of our own men, returned to camp. July 29, the enemy threw 64-pounder shells into our camp without doing us hurt. We remained inactive until August 16, when I was ordered by Colonel Knefler to take my own regiment and the Seventy-ninth Indiana, and go foraging. We went about ten miles to the left of our army, meeting no enemy, and returned that night. We remained in camp inactive until August 25, when we received orders to march. We marched at 10 p. m. with the balance of the brigade, moving to the right. and bivouacked in rea
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 82 (search)
for duty. July 25, Maj. . W. Osborn, chief of artillery, reported for duty. July 26, the artillery was organized into an artillery brigade, in accordance with General Orders, No.--, July 18, headquarters Department of the Cumberland. July 28 and 29, the range and distance having been given each battery from actual survey, in accordance with orders received from Major-General Stanley, commanding Fourth Army Corps, the rifled batteries opened fire upon Atlanta. July 29, the following assignmenJuly 29, the following assignment of artillery officers was made: Maj. T. W. Osborn, First New York Light Artillery, as chief of artillery; Capt. Lyman Bridges, Bridges' Battery, Illinois Light Artillery, as assistant chief of artillery; Capt. Theodore S. Thomasson, First Kentucky Light Battery, inspector of artillery. July 30, Major Osborn was relieved and I was appointed chief of artillery of the corps. July 31, Battery M, First Ohio Light Artillery, was placed in position on General Newton's left front. August 2, on
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 84 (search)
sion; remained in this position but a few moments; moved from this to the right of the division, by order of General Newton; took position on the right of Colonel Bradley's brigade; built works and remained in this position over night ; no casualties, although we lay under a heavy fire from the enemy's artillery. Remained in this position without doing any firing until July 27; opened fire on the enemy by order of General Newton. July 28, opened fire on Atlanta by order of Captain Bridges. July 29, opened fire on Atlanta by order of Captain Bridges, firing one shot a minute during the day; remained in same position until August 9, firing occasionally on the city, without any particular results; remained in same position until August 25, shelling the city occasionally. August 25, marched at 1 p. m. with Artillery Brigade about five miles to the right and went into camp. August 26, marched at 9 a. m. about six miles across the Euharlee [Utoy] Creek; went into position on the line,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 99 (search)
charged on, and the left:of the Twentieth Army Corps' skirmish line falling back before the advancing enemy, left our left exposed; but allowing it to refuse itself until the Twentieth Corps' line again advanced, we regained our former position, until relieved at evening by a brigade of the Twentieth Corps, when we fell back in reservesA our division, on the right of the railroad; our loss, 1 man wounded. July 26, relieved the Third Brigade on the front line. Nothing of: importance until July 29; report being that the rebels had left our front, our skirmishers advanced and found them in force, with plenty of artillery; fortified and held our advanced position; had a fatigue detail on skirmish line building works. August 1, attempted to advance our skirmish. line this morning, but; found too much opposition; the right wing of brigade move into works in advance of our line. August 3, relieved by Third Brigade and lay in reserve; I lost while on front line 1 man killed and 7 wou
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 101 (search)
road, some two miles from Atlanta, and constructed works under a heavy fire. The day was exceedingly hot, and 5 men fell from the effects of sunstroke. Were relieved in the evening and placed in reserve; loss, 1 killed. Remained in reserve until 26th July, when we relieved the Sixty-ninth Ohio, of Third Brigade, in works west of the railroad. 27th July, nothing of importance occurred with the regiment that I have to report. July 28, Company E was sent out to support the skirmish line. July 29, Company H was sent out to support the skirmish [line] in making a demonstration upon the works of the enemy. July 30, Company C was sent out to support the skirmish line in a demonstration on the enemy. 31st, nothing of importance occurred worth reporting. August 1, the regiment was ordered out to support Prescott's battery in position on the skirmish line. Constructed works in the evening on a new line, at the point where the picket reserves were last held; loss, I wounded. August
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 117 (search)
g rebels and met them again in about two miles of Atlanta. Here the regiment moved to the right and formed line of battle, erecting earth-works for its protection, the Thirty-seventh Indiana being in the front line. Here the regiment remained until July 2.6, when it was relieved by the First Brigade and placed in reserve. July 28, the regiment marched to the extreme right of the army to re-enforce the troops heavily engaged on that flank, and remained there without being engaged until July 29, when it returned to camp. The regiment laid in camp in reserve until August 2, when it was detailed to guard the corps supply train; with it the regiment remained repairing roads, guarding and aiding it in various ways during the remainder of the campaign. In conclusion, I would say that the officers and soldiers throughout the entire campaign behaved nobly, doing their whole duty under the most trying circumstances. All did so well that I think all are deserving of praise, and that
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 129 (search)
General Howard's right. Heavy skirmishing continuing in front, I determined to advance and take the first road to the left. This was done, and the division was moved with all dispatch back to Turner's Ferry road, arriving late in the evening, and, owing to a bad swamp and a dark night, was nearly all night getting into camp. The whole day's work can be summed up in a few words — a late start, an excessively hot day, a long and hard march (fourteen miles), and a late and very dark camp. July 29, division advanced, First Brigade on the right, about one and a half miles, crossed Green's Ferry road, and intrenched on the right of General Howard's command. July 30, brigade moved to the right, Sixtieth Illinois Infantry as skirmishers. July 31, division moved out on East Point road on a reconnaissance, First Brigade on the right; Sixteenth Illinois Infantry, deployed as skirmishers, drove the enemy's pickets across Utoy Creek. This is a fine regiment, then ably commanded by Lieutena
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