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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 224 224 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 42 42 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 21 21 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 19 19 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 17 17 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 17 17 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 11 11 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for July 30th or search for July 30th in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 3: closing of Southern ports.--increase of the Navy.--list of vessels and their stations.--purchased vessels.--vessels constructing, etc. (search)
ival of vessels from our foreign squadrons, the department early directed such as were dismantled and in ordinary at the different yards, and which could be made available, to be repaired and put in commission. They are exclusive of those lost at Norfolk Navy Yard, embraced in the following table: Names. Where. Ordered to be prepared for sea service with dispatch. Put in commission, or ready for officers and crew. Sailed. Frigates--   1861. 1861. 1861.   Potomac New York April 27 July 30 Sept. 10   St. Lawrence Philadelphia April 20 Late in May. June 29   Santee Portsmouth, N. H April 17 May 27 June 20 Sloops--           Savannah New York April 1 June 1 July 10   Jamestown Philadelphia April 9 May 18 June 8   Vincennes Boston April 9 June 24 July 12   Marion Portsmouth April 20 June 30 July 14   Dale Portsmouth April 20 June 30 July 17   Preble Boston April 20 June 22 July 11 Brigs--           Bainbridge Boston April 20 May 1 May
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
hese reports were constantly brought down concerning Buchanan's force, and they were far from reassuring to the Union commander, who up to this time had not received a single iron-clad. It was not until July 26th that the arrival of the Monitor Manhattan was reported. She was under Sand Island, in charge of gun-boats. The two double-turreted Monitors, Winnebago and Chickasaw, sent from Admiral Porter's fleet on the Mississippi, were in New Orleans, and would be off Mobile about the 30th of July. The Tecumseh was not yet heard from, and the Army which Farragut had asked for to co-operate with him was still in New Orleans. When the latter should arrive, Farragut would be quite ready to commence operations against the defences of Mobile. The arrival of the Manhattan was an assurance that Buchanan would not leave the bay to attack the Federal wooden ships, which Buchanan at no time had any idea of doing. His policy was to fight Farragut's fleet, under the cover of the forts, i
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
e. 1863. Object. Vessels engaged. July 18. Assault on Wagner Montauk, Ironsides, Catskill, Nantucket, Weehawken, Patapsco, Paul Jones, Ottawa, Seneca, Chippewa, Wissahickon. July 22. Wagner Nantucket, Ottawa. July 24. Wagner (to cover advance.) Weehawken, Ironsides, Catskill, Montauk, Patapsco. Nantucket, Ottawa, Dai Ching, Paul Jones, Seneca. July 25. Wagner Ottawa, Dai Ching, Paul Jones. July 28. Wagner Weehawken, Catskill, Ottawa. July 29. Wagner Ironsides, Patapsco. July 30. Wagner Ironsides, Catskill, Patapsco, Ottawa. July 31. Batteries on Morris Island Ottawa. Aug. 1. Wagner Montauk, Patapsco, Catskill, Weehawken, Passaic, Nahant, Marblehead. Aug. 2. Wagner Ottawa. Marblehead. Aug. 4. Wagner Montauk, Marblehead. Aug. 6. Wagner Marblehead. Aug. 8. Wagner Ottawa, Mahaska, Marblehead. Aug. 11. Wagner and vicinity Patapsco, Catskill. Aug. 13. Morris Island Dai Ching, Ottawa, Mahaska, Racer, Wissahickon. Aug. 14. Morris Island Wissahic