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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 224 224 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 42 42 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 21 21 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 19 19 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 17 17 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 17 17 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 11 11 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for July 30th or search for July 30th in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 9 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
nt of the town who enlisted since Oct. 17, 1863, who had received a less sum than others, be paid seventy-five dollars. July 30th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow five thousand three hundred and seventy-five dollars to recruit the quota of t 21st of May was increased to one thousand dollars. July 15th, A watchman was discharged for using seditious language. July 30th, State aid was directed to be paid to the families of drafted men. Ordered, that the bells be rung and a salute fired ors and be credited to the quota of the town; this to continue until March, 1865. Another town-meeting was held on the 30th of July, at which the selectmen were authorized to pay the same bounty to men who enlist in the navy. This was continued untioney, if necessary, to fill any future call of the President for men, up to March 1st, 1865. At a meeting held on the 30th of July, the bounty to volunteers for three years was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. 1865. A special meeting
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
, correspondence, and safety was chosen, to take such action as might be deemed expedient with reference to such persons within the town who might be inimical to the United States; also, on motion of Colonel Daniel Adams, voted, to give three cheers for Lieutenant-General Winfield Scott. The meeting then adjourned. We have given prominence to this remarkable meeting, as we believe it to have been the first meeting of the kind held in the United States. 1862. A town-meeting was held July 30th, for the purpose of filling the quota of the town, at which it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer for three years service. Another meeting was held August 16th, at which it was voted to pay nine-months men a bounty of two hundred and fifty dollars. During the remainder of the war the town paid the bounty fixed by the law of the State; namely, one hundred and twenty-five dollars, in addition to which thirty-two hundred and seventy-five dollars wer
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
such sums as may be necessary to pay bounties to volunteers, and aid to their families. November 3d, The selectmen were directed to pay the same aid to the families of drafted men as is paid to the families of volunteers. 1864. April 14th, The assessors were directed to assess a tax sufficient to reimburse the money which had been advanced by citizens for war purposes, said payments to be due on and after Jan. 5, 1865; and a committee of three was chosen to audit all of these claims. July 30th, The selectmen were authorized to deposit one thousand dollars with the State Treasurer, to pay bounties for men recruited by the State and credited to the town. Four recruits were obtained from the State, and five hundred dollars were returned to the town. 1865. Several meetings were held this year, but nothing of general interest was done. Northfield furnished about one hundred and seventy-five men for the war, which was a surplus of ten over and above all demands. Three were com
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
000. The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were F. L. Burley, William A. Webber, Warren A. Wallis; in 1863, William A. Webber, Horace Wallis, R. A. Blodgett; in 1864 and 1865, F. L. Burley, N. P. Marcy, Squire J. Ballard. The town-clerk and town-treasurer in 1861 was F. B. Blodgett; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, Francis Wight. 1861. November 5th, The treasurer, under the direction of the selectmen, was authorized to pay State aid to the families of soldiers, as provided by law. 1862. July 30th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty not exceeding one hundred dollars to each of four men who shall enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the town. The treasurer was directed to borrow four hundred dollars to pay the same. August 30th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer for nine. months' service to fill the quota of the town. The treasurer was directed to borrow the money. Voted, that whenever any of our soldiers shall
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
hem for recruiting purposes to fill said calls. The treasurer was authorized to borrow the money in anticipation of the tax. A similar vote was passed on the 30th of July. 1865. May 23d, Three thousand seven hundred and fifty-five dollars and fifty cents were appropriated to refund to individuals money advanced by them for runty of three hundred dollars to each citizen of the town who has been, or may be, drafted and mustered into the military service to fill the quota of the town. July 30th, Voted, to pay a bounty of fifty dollars to each volunteer for one year's service, eighty dollars to each for two years, and one hundred to each for three years of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who had enlisted to fill the quota of the town since Feb. 6, 1864, by reenlist-ment from old regiments. July 30th, Fifty-five hundred dollars were appropriated to pay the forty-four men the town is called upon to furnish. 1865. March 6th, The treasurer was authorized to b
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
uiting was appointed; also, a committee to make arrangement for a public meeting to be held on the 12th, to respond to the call of the Governor for immediate action. July 16th, The bounty to each volunteer was increased to one hundred dollars. July 30th, The appropriation for volunteers and their families was increased fifty thousand dollars. August 13th, The police were ordered to assist the assessors in making an enrollment of citizens between the ages of eighteen and forty-five years. Augus with power to incur any necessary expense. 1864. April 4th, Three thousand dollars were appropriated to pay bounties to twenty-five men to fill the contingent of the town under the calls of the President of Oct. 17, 1863, and Feb. 1, 1864. July 30th, The bounty to three-years volunteers was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so remained until the end of the war. Waltham furnished seven hundred men for the war, which was a surplus of seven over and above all demands. Twen
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
th the name of the company and regiment to which each soldier may belong. This record of names to be considered the roll of honor for coming generations to admire and reverence. 1862. July 7th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars for the term of ten days to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the town; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow twenty-two hundred dollars to pay the same and such additional sums as may be necessary. July 30th, Voted, to pay each volunteer a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow eleven hundred dollars to pay the same. August 13th, The same bounty was directed to be paid to drafted men. Voted, to pay a bounty of fifty dollars to each Sharon volunteer now in the service who has received no bounty. The treasurer was authorized to borrow four thousand dollars. August 21st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
died in 1862. A committee of five was appointed to provide proper assistance for the families of the soldiers. 1862. July 30th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist to the credit of the town, to be paid August 30th, The town ratified the action of the selectmen in paying a bounty of two hundred dollars under the vote of July 30th. On the 6th of September, voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to volunteers enlisting for nine months servicey belonging to the town; also, to pay State aid to their families as before, and to the families of deceased soldiers. July 30th, Voted, to pay the same aid to the families of drafted men that is paid to the families of volunteers. 1864. March 1n forming, when accepted by the State. The selectmen were authorized to expend two thousand dollars for that purpose. July 30th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay State aid to the soldiers' families. 1862. The selectmen were a
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
Ira Harrison, and Elisha M. Smith, in connection with the selectmen, were appointed to carry the foregoing vote into effect. November 8th, The town voted to pay the balance of board-bills due private individuals for boarding soldiers. 1862. July 30th, Voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to all men who had enlisted for three years service, and to all who should enlist within three days; to all those who should enlist within one week a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five ent of State aid to soldiers' families was continued. 1864. Meetings of citizens were held in April, May, and June to raise money by subscription to encourage recruiting and pay bounties, which was subsequently refunded by vote of the town. July 30th, The bounty to three-years volunteers was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and seven thousand dollars were appropriated to pay the same. Meetings were held frequently by the citizens during the year to devise means to raise mone