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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 224 224 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 42 42 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 21 21 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 19 19 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 17 17 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 17 17 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 11 11 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for July 30th or search for July 30th in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ing to Mr. Pond, had in all about 15,000 under his command. This victory caused an immediate change in the Federal programme. The troops that had been recalled to Richmond were ordered back from Washington and others in addition were sent up. Meantime Early again broke up railroad and canal and spread consternation by sending two brigades of cavalry to levy a contribution upon Chambersburg, and in case of refusal to burn it. Mc-Causland, in command of this expedition, burnt the town on July 30th, and as his men were improperly turned loose in it, there were no doubt many unjustifiable acts of plunder and wrong. But Mr. Pond gives an entirely unfair and one-sided account of this transaction. Grant's instruction to Hunter as expressed in a letter about this time were that he should make all the Valley south of the Baltimore and Ohio road a desert, as high up as possible. I do not mean that houses should be burned, but every particle of provisions and stock should be removed, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
ing to Mr. Pond, had in all about 15,000 under his command. This victory caused an immediate change in the Federal programme. The troops that had been recalled to Richmond were ordered back from Washington and others in addition were sent up. Meantime Early again broke up railroad and canal and spread consternation by sending two brigades of cavalry to levy a contribution upon Chambersburg, and in case of refusal to burn it. Mc-Causland, in command of this expedition, burnt the town on July 30th, and as his men were improperly turned loose in it, there were no doubt many unjustifiable acts of plunder and wrong. But Mr. Pond gives an entirely unfair and one-sided account of this transaction. Grant's instruction to Hunter as expressed in a letter about this time were that he should make all the Valley south of the Baltimore and Ohio road a desert, as high up as possible. I do not mean that houses should be burned, but every particle of provisions and stock should be removed, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Virginia campaign of 1864-1865. (search)
es in battle had risen to over 68,000, according to General Humphreys (p. 242), or to 75,000 by other authorities. These losses and the detachment of the Sixth Corps to Washington, made necessary by Early's advance on that city, rendered Grant for a time less aggressive. Great preparations were now made for the springing of a mine on the centre of Lee's Petersburg lines. A vigorous demonstration on the north side of the James called off a large part of Lee's forces, and on the morning of July 30, when but three Confederate divisions were at Petersburg, the mine was sprung. The explosion of 8,000 pounds of powder buried a regiment of Confederates and made a fearful gap in their lines. An assault was at once made by Burnside's corps, supported by Hancock, Warren, and Ord. Some preparations had been made by General Beauregard against such a contingency, but only skill of the highest order, and a courage that counted life as nothing worth on the part of the handful of Confederates wi