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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 395 395 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 370 370 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 156 156 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 46 46 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 36 36 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 29 29 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 26 26 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 25 25 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 23 23 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for August or search for August in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, POMERIUM (search)
tory in Italy (Sen. de brev. vit. 13; Mommsen, Staatsrecht ii. 738), but later it was expanded to cover the ager barbaricus (Hist. Aug. Aurel. 21). Of Sulla's extension nothing is known, nor of similar action ascribed to Julius Caesar (Cass. Dio xliii. 50), Augustus (Tac. Ann. xii. 23; Cass. Dio v. 6), Nero, Trajan and Aurelian (Hist. Aug. Aurel. 21). A recent attempt has been made (BC 1919, 24-32) by Laffranchi to show that Augustus' extension of the pomerium occurred thrice, in 27, 18 and 8 B.C., from an examination of his coins. Those used as evidence are Cohen, Aug. 114, 116, 117 (not 177); Babelon, Iulia 153, 155, 156; BM. Imp. i. p. 102, Nos. 628-630; 104, Nos. 637-642; cf. p. 29. An extension by Claudius in 49 A.D. is proved by unimpeachable literary testimony (Tac. Ann. xii. 24; Gell. xiii. 14. 7) and by the discovery of inscribed terminal cippi. These rectangular cippi bear on the top the word Pomerium, on the front the inscription recording the fact of the extension, and on
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, STATUA MARSYAE (search)
us plutei (see reff. under ROSTRA AUGUSTI); and coins struck by L. Marcius Censorinus between 86 and 81 B.C. (Babelon, Monnaies, Marcia 42; BM. Rep. i. 338, pl. xl. 3-4) represent the satyr standing on a square pedestal with right foot advanced, a wine skin thrown over his left shoulder with his left hand holding its opening, and his right hand raised. The statue is nude except for sandals and the Phrygian hat (pileus), and represents the Greek type of the fourth century B.C. How long before 8 B.C. this statue was erected in the forum, and why it was brought here, we do not know. According to a recent ingenious theory it was brought from Apamea in 188 B.C. by Cn. Manlius Vulso because of the legendary connection of that city with the tomb of Aeneas, and placed near the lacus Curtius because of a certain parallelism between the legendary self-sacrifice of an Apamean hero and Curtius (A. Reinach, Klio 1914, 321-337). The statue was often crowned with flowers, and a certain P. Munatius w
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, TIBERIS (search)
, at the second mile of the via Flaminia, downstream as far as the Almo on the left bank, while one was seen in the seventeenth century near S. Passera (opposite S. Paolo) on the right bank. On the other hand, it was the praetor urbanus who, a little earlier (the inscriptions are attributed to the time of Sulla), traced the boundary line between public and private property at Ostia (NS 1910, 554; YW 1911, 12; 1920, 89; Calza Ostia, 85). The next termination was carried out by the consuls of 8 B.C., C. Asinius Gallus and C. Marcius Censorinus, and twenty of these cippi remain (CIL vi. 31541, a-u), and a third by Augustus himself in the following year, twenty-two cippi remaining (ib. 31542, a-w). In this termination the distance in a straight line r(ecta) r(egione) to the next cippus is given in feet, on the front, back or side (cf. CIL cit. p. 3110; see RIPA VEIENTANA). In 15 A.D. a great inundation occurred, and the cura riparum was instituted by Tiberius (Tac. Ann. i. 76; Cass. Dio l
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
decrees the Ara Pacis, 30. 12(after). Pons Aemilius restored (?), 398. Fornix Augusti, 211. Augustus gives Domus Publica to the Vestals, 58. Horti of Agrippa, 264. Shrine of Vesta of Palatine dedicated, 557. (ca.). Tomb of C. Cestius, 478. 11-4Augustus restores the aqueducts, 13, 20, 21, 23-4, 25. 10Obelisks set up in Campus Martius and in the Circus, 366-7. 9Ara Pacis dedicated, 31. Augustus dedicates pedestal to Vulcan, 583. (after). Arch dedicated to Drusus the Elder, 39. 8Augustus founds the Cohorts of Vigiles, 128. Terminal stones of Tiber banks, 537. 7Rome divided in XIV regions, 444. (after). Augustus restores Temple of Consus, 141. Porticus Liviae dedicated, 423. Diribitorium dedicated by Augustus, 151. Campus Agrippae dedicated by Augustus, go. Tiberius rebuilds Temple of Concord, 139; and removes Basilica Opimia, 81; Augustus builds Atrium Minervae, 57. Macellum Liviae dedicated by Tiberius, 322. Terminal stones of Tiber banks, 537. 5A