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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 395 395 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 370 370 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 156 156 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 46 46 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 36 36 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 29 29 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 26 26 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 25 25 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 23 23 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for August or search for August in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
Editorial Paragraphs. Ex-Governor John C. Brown, we regret to say, has written us that he will not be able, from unforeseen engagements, to deliver his promised address at the White Sulphur Springs in August. As this information came too late to provide a substitute, we shall be compelled to dispense with the meeting, at which we had hoped to greet many of our friends, some of whom will be unable to attend our annual meeting in November. summer Drought is a phrase well understood by newspaper and magazine publishers. We are experiencing it just now, and remittances from our friends would, therefore, be doubly acceptable at this time. Mistakes in filling orders are as annoying to us as they can possibly be to subscribers, and we feel it due to ourselves to say that we have recently made changesin our office by which we hope, in large measure, to avoid any cause of complaint in the future. Our Contributors have placed us under many obligations for their favors
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Two witnesses on the treatment of prisoners --Hon. J. P. Benjamin and General B. F. Butler. (search)
of the sick and wounded now going on. To this I received a reply in substance: Do not give the Rebels a single able-bodied man. From that hour, so long as I remained in the department, exchanges of prisoners stopped under that order, because I could not give the Rebels any of their able-bodied soldiers in exchange. By sending the sick and wounded forward, however, some twelve thousand of our suffering soldiers were relieved, being upward of eight thousand more than we gave the Rebels. In August last, Mr. Ould, finding negotiations were broken off and that no exchanges were made, wrote to General Hitchcock, the Commissioner at Washington, that the Rebels were ready to exchange, man for man, all the prisoners held by them, as I had proposed in December. Under the instructions of the Lieutenant-General, I wrote to Mr. Ould a letter, which has been published, saying: Do you mean to give up all your action, and revoke all your laws about black men employed as soldiers? These questions
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The artillery at Second Manassas--Rejoinder of General S. D. Lee to General Longstreet. (search)
neral S. D. Lee to General Longstreet. In the November number of the Southern Historical Society Papers is the following letter of General Longstreet's, supplemented by one from Colonel J. B. Walton, claiming to be a reply to my article in the August number touching the artillery used at the battle of second Manassas: Gainesville, Georgia, September 6th, 1878. Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Virginia: In your issue of last month a paper appears from the pen of General S. D. Leive it a place in your Papers whenever it may be convenient. I am, very respectfully, your most obedient servant, James Longstreet. The above letter, including Colonel Walton's, does not at all meet the issue I raised in my article in the August number of the Historical Society Papers, but is a clear ignoring and evasion of that issue. The point raised in my article was that my eighteen (18) guns consisting of the batteries of Eubank, Jordan, Parker, Rhett, and a section of Grimes' ba
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual reunion of the Virginia division, A. N. V. (search)
rom the appreciation of the world. He eloquently and earnestly insisted that although the battle had been finally lost, it is our privilege and our duty to perpetuate. the fame of our great army. He said that in selecting orators for these reunions the Executive Committee had endeavored not only to choose a suitable speaker, but also to have different States represented. Acting on this principle, they had elected this year General J. B. Kershaw, of the noble Palmetto State. As late as August he had written that unforeseen engagements would compel him to withdraw his consent to speak. But the committee naturally turned to the old Second corps--the right arm of the Army of Northern Virginia --and ordered into their service a distinguished member of Stonewall Jackson's staff. He was happy to say that, even on this short notice, he had responded, and took pleasure in introducing, as orator of the evening, Colonel William Allan, of Maryland, who was Chief of Ordnance of the Secon