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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 395 395 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 370 370 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 156 156 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 46 46 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 36 36 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 29 29 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 26 26 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 25 25 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 23 23 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for August or search for August in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
. S. Society at Philadelphia in December, 1841, at which, however, the temporary suspension of the Freeman in favor of the Standard was voted (Lib. 12: 2, 3, 7, 8). Of the numerous meetings and conventions now instituted, that at Nantucket in August was a conspicuous Aug. 10, 11, 12, 1841; Lib. 11.130, 134. example of the glad renewal of anti-slavery fellowship (the sectarian spirit having been exorcised), and was otherwise memorable. No report is left of the social delights of companions. F. Mellen (ante, 2: 428), entitled, An Argument on the Unconstitutionality of Slavery. Mr. Garrison, on a hasty reading, judged it to deserve attention (Lib. 11.123); but when, at the Millbury quarterly meeting of the Mass. A. S. Society, in August, Mellen, in conjunction with S. S. Foster, attempted to embody this argument in a resolution, they were defeated (Lib. 11.139). It will be seen hereafter how the doctrine was forced upon the Third Party. So far, indeed, the Liberty Party might ha
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
ed to pass from boyhood. You will, I am sure, make the case your own, and act accordingly. The next three years were spent by James Garrison under his brother's roof, with a temporary stay at Ante, 2.358. Brooklyn during the latter's journey to England. In the summer of 1841, he made a voyage to New Brunswick, to visit his relations. He had taken the pledge of total abstinence, but was betrayed by the captain into breaking it, yet on the whole kept steady until he landed in Boston in August. Then that fatality which seemed to him to have its iron grip upon him, suppressing every effort of his fallen manhood to rise again, brought him to the Liberator office during his brother's absence in New Hampshire. While the latter, with Rogers, was making Ante, p. 22. the woods of the White Mountains ring with the anthems of the free, or rejoicing in the conversion of their Ante, p. 22. companion from the smoker's habit, James Garrison for the thousandth time fell, a victim to circums
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
ng the appearance of his little volume of Sonnets and other poems (ante, p. 8), he professed not to be ashamed of the sentiments expressed in his verses, though not persuaded of their poetical merit (Lib. 13.71). The Northampton Community had chosen a beautiful site on Mill River, some two or three miles from the town, in the suburb now known as Florence and as a great manufacturing centre. Mr. Garrison's delight in the natural scenery of the Connecticut Valley was shared for a week in August by N. P. Rogers, with whom he Lib. 13.131, 146; Ms. Aug. 12, 1843, Rogers to F. Jackson. drove in a gig on both sides of the river from Greenfield to Springfield. Shortly afterwards an accident occurred which sadly marred the pleasure of the sojourn at the Community. In watering his horse at a wayside brook, Mr. Garrison, by some maladroitness, upset his wife, with Lib. 13.135, 154. her three-year-old boy in her arms, and her aged mother, who all narrowly escaped drowning. Anne Weston s
s.). I cannot accept even an implied compliment at the expense of one whose past services and present value to the cause of human freedom I feel to be unequalled. Elsewhere, the Liberator's cry, No Union with Slaveholders! (now printed weekly at the head of the paper) was caught up and re-echoed in the abolition ranks—by the Western New York Anti-Slavery Society, in Feb. 5-7, 1845; Lib. 15.33. February; by a vast majority of the Eastern Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society at Kennett, in August. In Ohio, the Aug. 11-13; Lib. 15.135, 142. Anti-Slavery Bugle was founded as the disunion organ of the Ohio American Anti-Slavery Society. Lib. 15.109. The levers of disunion ready to the hands of the Massachusetts abolitionists were the recent expulsions of the Ante, pp. 130, 131. State's delegates from South Carolina and Louisiana, and the impending annexation of Texas. At the annual meeting just referred to, Wendell Phillips reported Lib. 15.19. resolves that the Governor shoul
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
21, this phase of the controversy was dwelt upon by Mr. Wright at a great meeting of the Emancipation Society at the City Hall in Glasgow; and George Thompson, after paying a most sincere and feeling tribute to his transatlantic Lib. 16.86, 87. friend, offered on behalf of the Society a resolution of sympathy with Mr. Garrison and his co-workers, and an invitation to come over and help the cause in Great Britain—with particular reference to an anti-slavery conference to be held in London in August. These proceedings were published in the Liberator of May 29. The proposal was very tempting. The opening year had found Mr. Garrison in poor health and much pecuniary embarrassment arising from the financial condition of the Liberator. Generous friends could and did gratefully relieve the one; Mss. Jan. 1, 1846, W. L. G. to Mrs. Louisa Loring; Jan. 6, Ann and Wendell Phillips to W. L. G. and wife; Jan. 12, W. L. G. to F. Jackson; Jan. 21, S. Philbrick to W. L. G. Mr. Phillips wrote:
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
e. Early in 1847, Mr. Garrison was solicited by the Ms. Mar. 8, 1847, J. Elizabeth James to W. L. G. abolitionists of Ohio to visit their section of the country; and in the Liberator of March 19 he gave notice that he would spend the month of August in that State. Lib. 17.46. This decision led to numerous invitations from friends in MSS. Feb. 28, 1847, Charlotte G. Coffin to H. E. G.; Mar. 23, O. A. Bowe to W. L. G. Central New York, as well as in Pennsylvania, along the two lines of Westethe army and navy (no human government heresy), distribution of the public lands. Gerrit Smith was Lib. 17.106, 113. nominated for the Presidency. Our old enemy, Liberty Party, wrote Wendell Phillips to Ms. Aug. 29, 1847. Elizabeth Pease in August, is fulfilling, oh, how exactly! our prophecies in 1840. I never saw predictions so accurately verified. We said she would be obliged to adopt more than one principle (hatred to slavery) before she would increase. Lo! Goodell and all Ne
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
ved the nomination of the Barnburners' Convention at Utica, which was thus imposed upon the Buffalo Convention. His letter of acceptance was adroit and plausible, and virtually retracted his pledge, made while President, to Ante, 2.82, 198. veto any bill abolishing slavery in the District of Columbia. Still, though the Liberty Party might swallow him without making a wry face, the venerable trickster could but excite the distrust of the abolition chiefs. Mr. Garrison wrote privately in August to Mr. Quincy from Northampton: As for the Free Soil movement, I feel that great care is Lib. 18.134. demanded of us Disunionists, both in the Standard and the Liberator, in giving credit to whom credit is due, and yet in no case even seeming to be satisfied with it. It is only placing the country in precisely the same condition, on the subject of slavery, that it occupied a quarter of a century since—to wit, that slavery ought not to be extended to new territories; that it ought to b
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 13: the Bible Convention.—1853. (search)
read the outpourings of the press, both secular and religious, on the Infidel Convention, as grouped in the Liberator. The mob, as usual, found Lib. 23.96. there its justification; and frightened editors even talked Lib. 23.95. of securing legislative prohibition of such gatherings in the State of Connecticut, in view of the announcement Proceedings Hartford Bible Convention, p. 371. that another Bible Convention would be held in January, 1854. An excursion to Flushing, Long Island, in August, to take part in the celebration of West India emancipation Aug. 4, 1853; Lib. 23.129. under the management of the New York City Anti-Slavery Society, This organization was consequent upon the transfer of Oliver Johnson from the editorship of the Pennsylvania Freeman to the associate editorship (with S. H. Gay) of the National Anti-Slavery Standard (Lib. 23: 47, 50, [78], 107). broke for a moment Mr. Garrison's summer rest. By the end of the same month, he was on his way to New York to
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 20: Abraham Lincoln.—1860. (search)
dertaking his customary share of public speaking. At the close of 1859, he was put under medical prohibition, and a journey abroad Ms. Oct. 18, 1859, W. L. G. to E. P. Nichol. seemed desirable, and was even planned for the coming spring. When that season arrived, an appointment for the summer had been made, but also some relief had come Ms. May 31, 1860, O. Johnson to J. M. McKim. of abstinence, and the trip was finally abandoned; a recreation with his family among the White Mountains in August being substituted. But throat and lungs and a Lib. 30.123. slow fever confined him still, for the remainder of the year, to home and Boston. He wrote but little for the Liberator, for this reason and because he had, since 1857, had a very active editorial assistant in Charles K. Whipple; but above all because the mighty movement begun by him now swept irresistibly along without the need of any man. Though the end is not yet, he said in his salutatory to the thirtieth volume of the Liberat