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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 395 395 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 370 370 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 156 156 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 46 46 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 36 36 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 29 29 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 26 26 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 25 25 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 23 23 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition.. You can also browse the collection for August or search for August in all documents.

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h corsairs, to the lasting interests of the American states, and to the rights of human nature, deeply wounded by this infamous practice. The words of Jefferson were universally approved; and the convention to which they were presented by Peyton Aug. Randolph came to this resolution: After the first day of November next, we will neither ourselves import, nor purchase any slave or slaves imported by any other person, either from Africa, the West Indies, or any other place. On the affairs of interest of any government on the continent, separately or collectively, to set up independence, but he rejected indignantly the claim of parliament, and saw no reason to expect anything from their justice. The crisis, he said, Chap. VI.} 1774. Aug. is arrived when we must assert our rights, or submit to every imposition that can be heaped upon us, till custom and use shall make us tame and abject slaves. From the first he was convinced that there was not any thing to be expected from petiti
ay of August, Gage received Chap. VIII.} 1774. Aug. an authentic copy of the act of parliament for the towns, and conferred on Chap. VIII.} 1774. Aug. the sheriffs of the several counties within theld be safely collected, and Chap. VIII.} 1774. Aug. that the province would peacefully acquiesce ino keep up the spirit of the Chap. VIII.} 1774. Aug. mob. No assembly existed in the province to reme was borne to the northern Chap. VIII.} 1774. Aug. border of the province, where the brooks run tos held conferences. The shire of Worcester in August set the example of a county congress, which dibeen a review of the Boston Chap. VIII.} 1774. Aug. regiment. The patriots speculated on the total companies paraded for discipline. One day in August, Gage revoked Hancock's commission in the Bostcil. It is a point of law, Chap. VIII.} 1774. Aug. said they, and should be referred to the crown cely mention any to you now. One evening in August the farmers of Union in Connecticut found Will[5 more...]
gates from Massachusetts, con Chap. IX.} 1774. Aug. secrated by their office as her suppliant ambasle county, in Virginia, had a Chap. IX.} 1774. Aug. month earlier expressed the same conclusion, annxious fear of Otis of Massa- Chap. IX.} 1774. Aug. chusetts; and was now the apprehension of Philiost sagacious believed. The last Tuesday in August was the day for holding the supreme court in B whose impetuous fearlessness Chap. IX.} 1774. Aug. was tempered by self-possession, gentleness, anrpers of power and enemies to Chap. IX.} 1774. Aug. the province, even though they bore the commissnant not to put their commis- Chap. IX.} 1774. Aug. sions in force; Worthington resigned his officef parliament, perished in the Chap. IX.} 1774. Aug. presence of the governor, the judges, and the able that he can never die too Chap. IX.} 1774. Aug. soon who lays down his life in support of the lon separated in the evening of the last day of August, to await the decisions of the continental con
Chapter 10: The Suffolk county convention. September, 1774. The province kept its powder for its militia at Chap. X.} 1774. Sept. Quarry Hill on a point of land between Medford and Cambridge, then within the limits of Charlestown. In August, the towns had been removing their stock, each according to its proportion. On Thursday morning, the first day of September, at half past 4, about two hundred and sixty men, commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Madison, embarked on board thirteen boats at Long Wharf, rowed up Mystic river, landed at Temple's farm, took from the public magazine all the powder that was there, amounting to two hundred and fifty half barrels, and transferred it to the castle. A detachment from the corps brought off two field-pieces from Cambridge. This forcible seizure, secretly planned and suddenly executed, set the country in a flame. Before evening, large bodies of the men of Middlesex began to collect; and on Friday morning, thousands of freeholders,
summons from Dunmore, borne beyond the Blue Ridge, roused the settlers on the Green Briar, the New River, and the Holston. The Watauga republicans also, who never owned English rule, and never required English protection, heard the cry of their brethren in distress; and a company of nearly fifty of them, under the command of Evan Shelby, with James Robertson and Valentine Sevier as sergeants, marched as volunteers. The name of every one of them is preserved and cherished. Leaving home in August, they crossed the New river, and joined the army of western Virginia at Camp Union, on the Great Levels of Green Briar. From that place, now called Lewisburg, to the mouth of the Great Kanawha, the distance is about one hundred and sixty miles. At that time there was not even a trace over the rugged mountains; but the gallant young woodsmen who formed the advance party, moved expeditiously with their packhorses and droves of cattle through the old home of the wolf, the deer, and the panther