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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 395 395 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 370 370 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 156 156 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 46 46 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 36 36 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 29 29 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 26 26 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 25 25 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 23 23 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 27, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for August or search for August in all documents.

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facturers, like the American manucturers, did not reduce their production during the summer, in proportion to the diminution in consumption, and that an accumnulation of manufactured goods has been the consequence.--Liverpool is continually receiving supplies of raw cotton, chiefly from India. How much may be received from that quarter is a mere question of prices. At the last advices from Bombay there were 200,000 bales there "on offer," if exporters to England would pay more than the native manufacturers. The receipts of India cotton at Liverpool next year will be one million of bales, or two millions, according to the prices which may rule. It is now said that the crop of cotton at the South will be seriously diminished by the heavy and unseasonable rains in August. It may fall to three millions of bales; but there will be enough of it, at any rate, and it will be brought out in abundant season, and obtained at low prices. Nobody will need a pound of it for six months yet.