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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
ceeded in carrying a work which was afterward abandoned, and his forces withdrawn to their former positions. From this time forward the operations in front of Petersburg and Richmond, until the spring campaign of 1865, were confined to the defense and extension of our lines and to offensive movements for crippling the enemy's lines — of communication and to prevent his detaching any considerable force to send south. Subordinate reports of operations against Petersburg and Richmond from August 1 to December 31, 1864, will appear in Vol. XLII. By the 7th of February our lines were extended to Hatcher's Run, and the Weldon railroad had been destroyed to Hicksford. General Sherman moved from Chattanooga on the 16th of May, with the Armies of the Cumberland, Tennessee, and Ohio, commanded, respectively, by Generals Thomas, McPherson, and Schofield, upon Johnston's army at Dalton; but finding the enemy's positions at Buzzard Roost, covering Dalton, too strong to be assaulted, Gener
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
by the flank, which afterward proceeded with comparative ease, but he met our extensions to the south by rapid and well constructed forts and rifle-pits built between us and the railroad to and below East Point, remaining perfectly on the defensive. Finding that the right flank of the Army of the Tennessee did not reach, I was forced to shift General Schofield to that flank also, and afterward General Palmer's corps, of General Thomas' army. General Schofield moved from the left on the 1st of August, and General Palmer's corps followed at once, taking a line below Utoy Creek, and General Schofield prolonged it to a point near East Point. The enemy made no offensive opposition, but watched our movement and extended his lines and parapets accordingly. About this time several changes in important commands occurred which should be noted. General Hooker, offended that General Howard was preferred to him as the successor of General McPherson, resigned his command of the Twentieth Co
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
on of the Army of the Cumberland, in case it was decided to transfer the Army of the Ohio to the right flank. The line was constructed under the superintendence of Lieutenant Wharton, U. S. Engineers, after it had been fully, discussed between Lieutenants Wharton, Twining, and myself. It extended from our front line near Walker's house, on the Collier's Mill (Buck Head) road nearly due north, to the line of rebel works evacuated on the night of the 2lst of July. On the night of the 1st of August the Army of the Ohio was withdrawn from its position on the left, and rapidly moved to the right near the poor-house and extending nearly to the north branch of Utoy Creek at Willis' Mill, the engineers giving general directions concerning the lines. I rode over their whole extent in person. August 2, the Army of the Tennessee swung forward its extreme right, about half a mile, turning upon its position at Ezra Church as a pivot. The Army of the Ohio connected with the right of the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 16 (search)
e that of the enemy. During the 29th, 30th, and 31st no change was made upon our line. Being notified that the Army of the Ohio would be withdrawn, leaving the Fourth Corps upon the flank of the army, a new flank was constructed upon the 1st of August running from the point at which the Buck Head road intersected our front line along the line of Spring Creek. This line we subsequently did not need to use. The Army of the Ohio moved out the night of the 1st of August, and it was deemed adv1st of August, and it was deemed advisable to keep up a show of force in the line occupied by them. The First Division and Kimball's brigade, of Newton's division, were accordingly so extended as to occupy all the line occupied by General Schofield. This was intended as only a temporary arrangement, to be maintained twenty-four hours, but was finally kept up until the investment of Atlanta was abandoned. The 2d was employed strengthening our lines. On the 3d a demonstration was made to attract the attention of the enemy from
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 21 (search)
m Peach Tree Creek. On the 19th moved at 3 p. m., crossed the creek, and halted for the night and threw up light works. On the 20th marched at 6 a. m., marching slowly until 4 p. m., when we marched toward Atlanta, relieving the skirmishers of the Twentythird Army Corps by details, one of which was from my command, also throwing up heavy works. We remained here until the 26th, when we moved to the rear and occupied the line of works left by the enemy on the night of the 21st. On the 1st of August we moved to the front and occupied part of the works vacated by the Twentythird Army Corps. While here I had 3 men slightly wounded by the enemy's shells. We also were employed while here in picket duty. At night-fall on the 25th we moved to the rear and right, halting at 11 p. m. On the 26th marched at 10 a. m., halting at 9 p. m. On the 27th marched rapidly six miles and halted at Mount Gilead Church and threw up light works. On the 28th we marched to the Montgomery railroad and ha
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 22 (search)
n, the enemy having left, we moved forward. Upon coming up with the enemy's line, were formed, threw up works, and remained in position till the 26th. The night of July 26 moved to lines protecting the left flank and rear, remaining there till August 1. Loss in July, 1 enlisted man killed; 1 commissioned officer and 2 enlisted men wounded. August 1, the regiment was ordered out, and threw up works near corps headquarters. At night were ordered to rejoin the brigade, when we took positionAugust 1, the regiment was ordered out, and threw up works near corps headquarters. At night were ordered to rejoin the brigade, when we took position on the left, relieving the Twenty-third Corps; remained there, with a few changes in the line, till the night of the 25th, when the brigade moved to the right. August 26, about 11 a. m. were ordered to support the Eighty-first Indiana on the skirmish line, and, deploying, were ordered to the works held by the enemy. The regiment charged and, driving them out, occupied the works. .The left was immediately exposed to a flank fire and fell back. The left was refused and the line held till order
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 24 (search)
ront for a distance of 200 yards, and an abatis consti ucted through which it was impossible for a. line of battle to advance. On the night of the 26th instant (the Army of the Tennessee having marched from our left flank around to the right. thereby leaving our rear and left exposed) I was ordered to move my brigade to the rear about one and a half miles and take position in the rebel works, abandoned by them on the night of the 21st instant. These we strengthened and held until the 1st of August, when we were ordered to relieve a brigade of the Twenty-third Corps, directly on the left of the position we had previously occupied before Atlanta. Here the entire brigade, with the exception of the Fifty-first Ohio, which was kept in reserve, was put into the front line of trenches, and remained there until the night of the 25th instant. During this time I was frequently ordered to make demonstrations on the enemy's line, which I did with as much success as was possible, considering
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
hich we held during the day. July 22, the enemy evacuated our front during the night. Our brigade started in pursuit at 4 a. m., capturing 15 of the enemy. Found them in force within three miles of Atlanta. Formed in line and built works. July 23, occupied the position we fortified yesterday. July 24, 25, 26, and 27, remained in our position. Strengthened our fortifications. No fighting of importance in our front. July 28, 29, 30, and 31, things remained unchanged in our front. August 1 and 2, nothing of importance occurred on our front during the last two days. August 3, our skirmish line was advanced this afternoon, charging that of the enemy and capturing 30 prisoners, but they massed their forces and compelled ours to fall back. Our loss slight. August 4, all quiet in our front to-day. August 5, skirmishers advanced and tried to drive in or capture the rebel skirmish line, but failed. No loss in regiment. August 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10, all quiet in our front during th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 37 (search)
out toward Atlanta. The enemy's pickets were encountered at a point two miles from the city, and line of battle was formed and works were thrown up by us under a rapid fire of shell from his forts and intrenchments, at short range, which, however, did but little damage. My brigade occupied the same general position which was first assigned it on the 22d until the 26th, when it was withdrawn from the front and bivouacked about 600 yards to the rear, where it remained until near sundown of August 1, when it was ordered by you to move to the extreme left of our lines to a point near the Howard house and relieve a part of the Twenty-third Army Corps, which movement was accomplished early in the evening. The brigade remained in the position sotaken, skirmishing with and watching the enemy, without any unusual action until the 4th of August, when I was relieved from the command of it and assigned to the command of the First Division of this corps, Col. E. Opdycke, of the One hundred and
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 39 (search)
t, the regiment marched through Marietta, Ga., toward the Chattahoochee River, crossed the river at Roswell on the 9th, and with the rest of the brigade fortified a position on the left bank of the stream. Several unimportant changes were made, when on the 18th of July the regiment marched with the army toward Atlanta, Ga. Was in battle on the left bank of Peach Tree Creek July 20. Our loss was very light and that of the enemy very severe. The regiment remained in camp near Atlanta until August 1, when with the rest of the brigade moved to the extreme left of the army near the Augusta railroad. August 24, Lieutenant-Colonel Olson took command. In accordance with orders from Colonel Opdycke, the brigade commander, the Thirty-sixth Illinois marched with the column at dark August 25, in the direction of the right of the army, upon the Sandtown road. We reached the Macon railroad near Rough and Ready September 1. By direction of the brigade commander, we formed part of the force enga
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