Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for August 1st or search for August 1st in all documents.

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over 50,000, but 35,000 will probably cover the entire force in action at the Stone Bridge. Of the pursuit, already the particulars are known. Suffice it to say, we followed them on the Leesburg road and on the Centreville road as far as Centreville and Fairfax. The poor wretches dropped their guns, their knapsacks, their blankets, and every thing they had — they fell on their knees and prayed for mercy. They received it — Southerners have no animosity against a defeated enemy. We have captured 900 prisoners, and they will be treated with kindness. We have also captured 67 pieces of cannon, among them numerous fine pieces, Armstrong guns, and rifled cannon, hundreds of wagons, loads of provisions, and ammunition. The credit is accorded them: they fought well and long, but their cause was bad — they were on soil not their own, and they met their equals, who were fighting in defence of their homes, their liberty, and their honor.--Richmond Dispatch, and Baltimore Sun, August 1
Doc. 138.-Colonel miles' defence. Col. Miles commanded the reserves, at the battle of Bull Run. Being accused of drunkenness and other conduct unbecoming a soldier, he published the following card, in the Washington Star, of August 1: Alexandria, Va., July 31, 1861. Editor of the Star — dear sir: Will you please give place in your columns to a short reply from an old soldier, in correction of Col. Richardson's report, as published in this morning's Sun. Perhaps no one has ever before been hunted with more assiduous, malicious vituperation and falsehood, since the battle of Bull Run, than myself. My name, I am told, has been a byword in the streets of Washington and its bar-rooms for every thing derogatory to my character. It was stated I had deserted to the enemy; I was a traitor, being from Maryland, a sympathizer; gave the order to retreat; was in arrest, and now, by Col. Richardson's report, drunk. I shall not copy Richardson's report, but correct the errors he
Doc. 151.-Inaugural of Governor Gamble, delivered at Jefferson city, Mo., Aug. 1. Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Convention:--I feel greatly oppressed by the circumstances under which I now stand before you. After a life spent in labor, I had hoped that I would be permitted to pass its evening in retirement. I have never coveted public office, never desired public station. I have been content to discharge my duties as a private citizen, and I hoped such would be my lot during the remainder of my life. Circumstances seemed to make it a duty for me, when the convention was first elected, to agree to serve as one of its members, because the condition of the State and country at large seemed to demand that every citizen of the State should throw aside his own preferences, choice, and even his own scheme of life, if necessary, in order to serve the country. In accordance with what I regarded as an obligation every citizen owes to the community of which he is a member, I allow
Doc. 153.-Gen. Fremont's expedition. St. Louis, Aug. 1. Unusual interest has been created by the unwonted military activity which has followed the arrival of Major-General Fremont in St. Louis. Regiments have been constantly arriving, the city has been fairly thronged with troops; eight steamboats have been preparing for their transportation down the river, and on last evening there were strong indications that the great fleet was about to move. The commanding general of this department has not seen proper to inform the public accurately beforehand with respect to the precise objects of his enterprise, plans of his campaign, or date of the departure of his expedition. Upon these points time will undoubtedly enlighten the community. The steamers City of Alton, Louisiana, and D. A. January remained at the arsenal at a late hour last night. On board the former were the baggage and arms of a large portion of the rank and file of the Nineteenth Illinois regiment. During t
day, the 28th of July, and on the next day effected a junction with the armies of Gens. McCulloch and Pearce. The combined armies were then put under marching orders, and the First Division, Gen. McCulloch commanding, left Cassville on the 1st of August, upon the road to this city. The Second Division, under Gen. Pearce, of Arkansas, left on the 1st day of August; and the Third Division, Brig.-Gen. Steen, of this State, commanding, left on the 2d day of August. I went forward with the Seco1st day of August; and the Third Division, Brig.-Gen. Steen, of this State, commanding, left on the 2d day of August. I went forward with the Second Division, which embraced the greater portion of my infantry, and encamped with it some twelve miles north-west of Cassville. The next morning, a messenger from Gen. McCulloch informed me that he had reason to believe that the enemy were in force on the road to Springfield, and that he should remain at his then encampment on Crane Creek until the Second and Third Divisions of the army had come up. The Second Division consequently moved forward to Crane Creek, and I ordered the Third Divisio
day, the 28th of July, and on the next day effected a junction with the armies of Gens. McCulloch and Pearce. The combined armies were then put under marching orders, and the First Division, Gen. McCulloch commanding, left Cassville on the 1st of August, upon the road to this city. The Second Division, under Gen. Pearce, of Arkansas, left on the 1st day of August; and the Third Division, Brig.-Gen. Steen, of this State, commanding, left on the 2d day of August. I went forward with the Seco1st day of August; and the Third Division, Brig.-Gen. Steen, of this State, commanding, left on the 2d day of August. I went forward with the Second Division, which embraced the greater portion of my infantry, and encamped with it some twelve miles north-west of Cassville. The next morning, a messenger from Gen. McCulloch informed me that he had reason to believe that the enemy were in force on the road to Springfield, and that he should remain at his then encampment on Crane Creek until the Second and Third Divisions of the army had come up. The Second Division consequently moved forward to Crane Creek, and I ordered the Third Divisio