Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for August 1st or search for August 1st in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
ve dollars, or the limit of the law, be, and is hereby voted, and the selectmen be instructed to assess on the polls and estates of the inhabitants of Peru said sum. The selectmen were authorized to use the credit of the town to pay bounties. August 1st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer to fill the present call. The treasurer was authorized to borrow six hundred and twenty-five dollars. One man in each school district was chosen to canvass the tore authorized to immediately open a recruiting-office, and to borrow money to pay the bounties. August 25th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, and to borrow money to pay the same. 1863. August 1st, The selectmen were directed to pay State aid to the families of drafted men the same as to the families of volunteers; also, the expense of transportation of the drafted men from Stockbridge to the military camp at Springfield, and to borrow m
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
with reasonable pay. Another town-meeting was held on the 24th of September, when the recruiting officer was directed to enlist eighteen volunteers for nine months service, and to pay the expenses of recruits from home to camp and back, who may be rejected. On the 14th of October the town voted to borrow money to pay State aid to the families of volunteers, and twelve hundred dollars to pay bounties to recruits to fill the quota of the town. 1863. A special meeting was held on the 1st of August, at which the selectmen were directed to pay State aid to the families of drafted men; and on the 10th of December the town voted to pay a bounty of three hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer, provided the State will refund the same; See introductory chapter, page 14. and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money. 1864. A town-meeting was held on the 4th of April, at which eleven hundred and twenty-five dollars were appropriated to reimburse citizens who had volunta
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
to each volunteer, to the number of twenty-one, who shall enlist from this town for three years, said bounty to be paid upon the production of satisfactory evidence of enlistment and mustering in as above; voted, that the payment of the above bounty be limited to those who enlist in the month of July. July 26th, Voted, to authorize the selectmen to pay fifty dollars, in addition to the amount previously voted, to all residents that have, or may, volunteer from this town previous to the 1st of August next. The following resolution was also passed, and recorded upon the town records:— Resolved, That we have learned with pain and sadness of the privations and sufferings of our soldiers in the late battles before Richmond, especially those who went from our midst; that they all deserve our deepest sympathy and highest gratitude for the heroic bravery and unyielding fortitude with which they met the trials of that terrible carnage; and that we will ever revere the memory of our town
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
y of E. P. Smith ten dollars, a month, from July 8, 1861, and while they remained in the service. 1862. April 7th, Four hundred dollars were appropriated for aid to soldiers' families. April 21st, Two hundred dollars were added to this sum. August 1st, The selectmen were instructed to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each inhabitant of the town, to the number of seventeen, who shall volunteer for three years service, and be credited to the quota of the town; and to borrow seventeen hundred dollars to pay the same. At a meeting held September 2d, eighty-four dollars and eighty cents were added to the amount appropriated on the 1st of August; and a bounty of two hundred dollars was authorized to be paid to volunteers for nine months service. 1863. September 21st, Voted, to raise twenty-nine hundred and five dollars and eighty-four cents, in obedience to a law passed April 29, 1863, entitled an act for the reimbursement of bounties paid to volunteers. 1864. April 4th,
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
n 1863, Medad King, Enoch H. Lyman, Henry M. Parsons; in 1864, Enoch H. Lyman, Henry M. Parsons, Elbert Langdon; in 1865, Elbert Langdon, Albert G. Jewett, Henry W. Montague. The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all these years was David W. Clark. 1861. There does not appear to have been any action taken by the town in its corporate capacity in relation to the war during this year. 1862. The first meeting held by the town to consider matters in relation to the war was on the 1st of August, at which it was voted to pay a bounty of seventy-five dollars to each volunteer credited to the town who shall enlist for nine months in the military service. The selectmen were authorized to borrow money for that purpose. October 4th, The treasurer was directed to pay back to the several collectors all moneys paid in by them as bounty money for the town's first quota of three hundred thousand men, and that the town treasurer be authorized to borrow six hundred dollars to pay equally
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
and dollars were appropriated to pay bounties to volunteers who should enlist for three years service, to fill the quota of the town under the recent call of the President, and to assess the same upon the inhabitants, and be payable on the first day of August next. Another town-meeting was held on the 27th of August, at which it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who should enlist in the Concord Company then being recruited for nine months service, and the selecer. 1864. March 26th, Voted, to raise not exceeding fifteen hundred dollars to refund to individuals the amounts they had paid voluntarily to aid recruiting. May 9th, Voted, to raise one thousand dollars to aid in filling the town's quota. August 1st, Voted, to continue paying a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who may enlist to the credit of the town up to March 1, 1865, and to deposit five hundred dollars with the State treasurer for recruiting purposes. Two recruits wer
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
ough who enlisted in Company F, Fourth Regiment, for nine months service, and if more men are needed to fill the town's quota to pay the same bounty to others. 1863. September 26th, Voted, that the same State aid be given to the families of drafted men that is given to the families of volunteers. 1864. March 26th, Three thousand nine hundred dollars were appropriated to reimburse individuals of the town who had voluntarily contributed of their personal means money to aid recruiting. August 1st, Voted, to give a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who would enlist to complete the quota of the town under the call of the President then pending. Foxborough furnished two hundred and seventy-six men for the war, which was a surplus of thirteen over and above all demands. Nineteen were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was twenty-one thousand seven hundre
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
hs service. 1863. No action appears to have been necessary by the town during this year to keep up its contingent of men and to provide for the families of the volunteers. 1864. April 4th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for three years service. June 14th, Voted, to raise five thousand dollars to procure forty volunteers to be applied to the quota of this town in anticipation of any future call of the President. August 1st, Voted, to pay the same bounty to volunteers enlisting in the navy as paid to those in the military service. East Bridgewater furnished about three hundred and fifty men, and had a surplus at the end of the war of fifteen over and above all demands. Fourteen were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was fifty-five thousand seven dollars and three cents ($55,007.03). The amount of money
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
bring home the bodies for burial. 1863. July 22d, Voted, to pay State aid to the families of drafted men and substitutes belonging to Northborough. 1864. August 1st, The bounty to be paid to volunteers for three years service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so remained until the end of the war. Novembe July 3d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the town before the 1st of August next. August 22d, The time was extended until the quota of the town was filled. A bounty of one hundred dollars was authorized to be paid to any inhabitant oid to families of volunteers as will be reimbursed by the State. April 25th, Voted, to grant seven hundred and fifty dollars to pay bounties to five recruits. August 1st, The selectmen were authorized to pay one hundred and twenty-five dollars to any person liable to draft who furnished a substitute; also, to keep on recruiting,