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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 1: introductory and explanatory. (search)
and fixed the amount of the bounty which they authorized to be paid. The amounts offered by each did not materially vary, although each fixed its own without consulting the others, and without their knowledge. The votes only show how nearly of one mind the towns were. Recruiting began with much earnestness, and in less than sixty days the whole number was obtained. While in the midst of recruiting the fifteen thousand three-years men, another order was issued by the President on the 4th of August, calling for three hundred thousand men for nine months service, supplemented with the information that, if not furnished within a comparatively short time, a draft would be resorted to. Of these men Massachusetts was to furnish nineteen thousand and eighty. Thus on two separate calls, issued within four weeks of each other, Massachusetts was asked to furnish without delay thirty-four thousand and eighty men. Before either of these calls was made, Massachusetts had furnished thirty-five
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
e necessary for the payment of State aid. On the 22d of July the town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years, and be credited to the quota of the town. Another meeting was held on the 4th of August, when the town voted to increase the bounty to two hundred dollars. On the 25th of August the bounty to each volunteer for nine months service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. 1863. At a meeting held on the 2d of November, dollars, for aid to soldiers' families. July 22d, Voted, to pay to each volunteer for three years service (to the number of twenty-nine) a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars, when mustered in and credited to the quota of the town. August 4th, The bounty to each three-years volunteer was increased to two hundred dollars. Calvin W. Pool was appointed recruiting agent for the town. The quota was soon filled, and the men went into Company F, Thirty-fifth Regiment Massachusetts Volun
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
ounty therefor not to exceed one hundred and twenty-five dollars for each man. They were further instructed to get them at the least rate possible. March 2d, Voted, that the selectmen pay all volunteers' families State aid who, in their opinion, are in want. July 22d, A railroad bridge at Greenfield having been burned, a report was circulated that it was set on fire by rebels. The selectmen of Buckland appointed twenty night police to protect the bridges and other property in the town. August 4th, Voted, to pay the same aid to the families of drafted men as was paid to the families of volunteers. December 12th, Voted, that the town authorize the selectmen to use all lawful means to procure volunteers, and that the town shall pay their expenses. 1864. March 7th, Voted, that the account for recruiting ($3,532.55) be allowed and placed on record. March 29th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow twenty-five hundred dollars for military purposes. May 23d, Voted, to raise sevent
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
and one, who shall enlist within two weeks, for three years, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town. August 4th, A resolution was passed approving of the new call for three hundred thousand more men, and earnestly requesting the Prmen were authorized to appropriate such further sum as may be necessary for the comfort of soldiers' families. 1864. August 4th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who enlists for three years, and is crdiscontinued. July 14th, The selectmen were given discretionary power to pay State aid to the families of volunteers. August 4th, The town assumed the payment of thirty-two hundred dollars, which had been subscribed by individuals. George O. Carpeounty of one hundred and ten dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years to fill the quota of the town. August 4th, The bounty was raised to one hundred and fifty dollars, and as a test vote to ascertain whether it was the wish of the
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
rs of age. 1864. April 14th, Voted, to raise two thousand eight hundred and seventy-five dollars to refund money advanced by individuals for recruiting purposes, and two thousand two hundred and fifty dollars were appropriated for bounties. August 4th, The bounty to each volunteer enlisting for three years to the credit of the town was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so continued until the end of the war. 1865. May 22d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow a sufficien29th, The selectmen were authorized to pay State aid to the families of drafted men the same as to families of volunteers. November 7th, Two thousand dollars were appropriated for aid to soldiers' families and for recruiting expenses. 1864. August 4th, The bounty for each volunteer who should enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the town was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so continued until the end of the war. 1865. April 3d, Two thousand dollars were
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
ed this evening as a soldier from this town. 1863. March 2d, Voted, to raise three hundred and seventy-five dollars to pay the interest on the bounty-money; also gave authority to the treasurer to borrow not exceeding five thousand dollars. August 4th, Voted, to raise three hundred dollars for each drafted man who actually goes into the service of the United States. E. B. K. Gurney, William Bourne, and Elbridge E. Bates were appointed to procure substitutes for the drafted men who desire itfifty dollars to purchase uniforms for soldiers who may volunteer from Hanover. It was also voted to pay each soldier a dollar a day for drilling. November 6th, Voted, to raise six hundred dollars for State aid to soldiers' families. 1862. August 4th, Voted, to raise six thousand six hundred dollars to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years to the credit of the town within one week. August 23d, The bounty was fixed at one hundred and fifty do
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
f respect to his memory the city council will attend his funeral. 1862. February 3d, Twelve thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to soldiers' families, which the treasurer was authorized to borrow. July 14th, Twentysix thousand dollars were appropriated to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to every inhabitant of the city, to the number of two hundred and sixty-one, who shall enlist for three years into the service of the United States on or before the fourth day of August next, to be paid when mustered in and credited to the quota of the city. August 27th, The same bounty was ordered to be paid to volunteers in the nine-months service. Fifty thousand dollars were appropriated to pay the same, and for war contingencies. December 15th, The order to pay bounties to more nine-months men was rescinded. The payment to volunteers for three years service was continued. 1863. January 26th, Ten thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment of State