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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for August 4th or search for August 4th in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Europe revisited--1877; aet. 58 (search)
y, cloth-lined, secondclass carriages! Still, the travellers arrived looking as proud as they could, wearing their best frocks and bonnets. They travelled with the Englishwoman's outfit. Three suits. Hightum, tightum, and scrub. Hightum was for any chance festivity, tightum for the table d'hote, scrub for everyday travelling. The question of the three degrees was anxiously discussed on this occasion; it was finally decided that only hightum would come up to the Von Rabe standard. August 4. Arrived at Czerwinsk, where sister L. and Baron von Rabe met us. He kissed my hand in a courtly manner. My sister looks well, but has had a hard time. We drove to Lesnian where Annie von R. and her mother-in-law made us welcome. August 9, Lesnian. A quiet day at home, writing and some work. Tea with Sister L. in the open air. Then went with Baron von Rabe to visit his farm buildings, which are very extensive; not so nicely finished as would be the case in America. We got many fleas
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
ng Westphalian on board astonished us all by his powers of drinking and of smoking. He talked with me; said, Sie sind deutsch, which I denied. August 3. Reached Schwalbach at three. My dear sister [Mrs. Terry] came out to greet us. The meeting was a little tearful, but also cheerful. Much has passed and passed away in these eventful years . ... Presently Louisa and I were as though we had not been parted at all. She is little changed, and retains her old grace and charm of manner. August 4. Out early with my sister. We have a regular and restful plan of living. Meet after dinner, coffee with my sister at half-past 4, supper at halfpast seven in the evening reading aloud and conversation. I am miserable with pain, probably rheumatic, in my left hip. Think I must have got a chill on the Rhine boat. I say nothing about this. Daisy and Wintie [Mr. and Mrs. Winthrop Chanler] came this afternoon. August 7. To Anglican service with my dear sister. A dull sermon. The servic