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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 274 274 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 33 33 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 15 15 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 15 15 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 13 13 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 9 9 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for August 5th or search for August 5th in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

ge Federal steamer ahead, attempting to cut her off. The Nixon tacked, and stood in again for the Pass, and reached the bar about a mile ahead of the Federalist. The latter then opened fire on her at that distance; the Nixon immediately responded, and the exchange of shots was carried on for about twenty minutes. In the mean time the little Lake steamer Arrow came up, and when within range of the Federalist, let slip some of her 32‘s at the Yankees. At about twenty minutes after the firing commenced, the Federalist, with three of the Nixon's heavy pills in her hull, got up a big head of steam, and crowding on every inch of canvas she could use, made regular Manassas time seaward. Not the slightest injury was received by the Nixon or the steamer Arrow, whilst it is thought that the additional weight of those three balls which were lent the Federalist by the Nixon, may impede her progress to some extent. She has not been seen in that quarter since. --New Orleans Delta, August 5
, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of my intentions, and firmly believing that I am herein carrying into effect the will of the people of Missouri, do hereby, in their name, by their authority, and on their behalf, and subject at all times to their free and unbiased control, make and publish this provisional declaration, that by the acts, and people, and Government of the United States of America, the political connection heretofore existing between said States and the people and government of Missouri is, and ought to be, totally dissolved ; and that the State of Missouri, as a sovereign, free, and independent republic, has full power to levy war, conclude peace, contract alliances, establish commerce, and to do all other acts and things which independent States may of right do. Published and declared at New Madrid, Missouri, this fifth day of August, in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and sixty-one. Claiborne F. Jackson, Governor of Missouri.
and held. The horses are of the finest Virginia stock, and are considered quite a prize. The prisoners will all be well treated, and profess to be good Union men. This is reliable, and will relieve the dulness of the war news for the last few days. --X. --Baltimore American, August 6. The following is a copy of the report of Colonel John C. Starkweather, of the First regiment Wisconsin Volunteers, relative to the operations which preceded the affair opposite Point of Rocks to-day, August 5: Headquarters First regiment W. V., camp Starkweather, August 3, 1861. Major Robert Williams, A. A. G., Harper's Ferry: dear sir: In compliance with my orders Messrs. Clark, Stone, Bennett, and Allen, of Companies E and F, Wisconsin Volunteers, crossed the Potomac, at Edwards' Ferry, with a skiff, on the 1st instant, at about four o'clock, and concealed themselves until morning, in order to examine fully the ford and other surroundings. Having secured the information that the enem
ave amounted, comparatively, to nothing. And further, it was only after the repeated requests and urgings of all the officers that Capt. Poor concluded to send notice to the flag-officer of the squadron at Pensacola, informing him of the escape of the Sumter. I repeat it, that had it not been for the repeated urgings of our officers, we would have gone back to our old anchorage, from which place there is no manner nor chance of communication with Pensacola. However, after the representation of the officers in question, a boat was sent up to the gunboat Massachusetts, despatching her to the flag-officer with the information of the Sumter's escape. We learned subsequently that the Niagara had gone in pursuit of her; we hope soon to overhaul her; yet, in the mean time, I repeat, she may capture millions of dollars' worth of property, sink and burn at pleasure, and all this must be suffered, owing to Capt. Poor's very poor judgment in the matter. --Baltimore American, August 5.