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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
n Howes was added to the above committee. 1864. April 22d, Voted, to raise six thousand dollars, to pay each recruit who enlisted to fill the quota of the town under the last two calls of the President one hundred and twenty-five dollars each. One thousand dollars was also voted to pay bounties to men who had enlisted to the credit of the town and had received no bounty. The treasurer was authorized to borrow money to procure volunteers under any call which the President might issue. August 6th, The selectmen were authorized to deposit fifteen hundred dollars with the State treasurer to procure recruits. December 19th, Voted, that the selectmen be authorized to procure recruits in anticipation of a call for five hundred thousand men. Yarmouth must have furnished about two hundred and fifty men for the war, which was a surplus of five over and above all demands, none of whom were commissioned officers in the military service. There were fifteen who were volunteer officers in
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
s voted to pay the family of Charles Goodell fifty dollars, he having volunteered in the military service of the United States. 1862. August 18th, Voted, to pay a bounty of seventy-five dollars to each volunteer who has already enlisted in the military service, and been credited to the quota of the town. 1863. At a meeting held on the 2d of March it was voted to pay to each volunteer, who shall enlist and be credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of one hundred dollars. On the 6th of August this bounty was increased twenty-five dollars. 1864. February 18th, The bounty to each volunteer who should enlist and be credited to the town was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so remained until the end of the war. The money to pay which was to be raised by taxation. New Ashford furnished twenty-three men for the war, which was a surplus of one over and above all demands. None were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by t
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
e selectmen were also directed to extend aid to the sick soldiers who have been discharged from service, and a committee was chosen to have the proceedings of the meeting published in the Union Gazette and Democrat. At a meeting held on the 6th of August it was voted to appropriate the sum of two hundred dollars, in addition to the sum appropriated at the last meeting, for the encouragement of enlistments; and to authorize the treasurer to borrow money to carry the same into effect. This bou. July 15th, A watchman was discharged for using seditious language. July 30th, State aid was directed to be paid to the families of drafted men. Ordered, that the bells be rung and a salute fired on the day of the Public Thanksgiving on the 6th of August. September 24th, The treasurer was directed to pay the Treasurer of the Commonwealth $15,450.68, under the laws in relation to the reimbursement of bounties. 1864. November 17th, Voted, that the poll-taxes of the returned soldiers belongi
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
record made up, we shall cause to be erected in the town hall, near the speaker's desk, a tablet, on which shall be inscribed, over the names of those who have fallen, martyrs to the Sacred cause of Liberty who perished in the great Rebellion. 1864. April 16th, The bounty to volunteers for three years service, who should enlist under any call of the President previous to March 1, 1865, was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so remained until the end of the war. On the 6th of August it was voted to pay the bounty in gold. August 27th, Voted, to raise a contingent fund of seventy-five thousand dollars for recruiting purposes and the payment of bounty. 1865. March 13th, The selectmen were instructed to continue enlisting men in anticipation of any future calls for volunteers. Haverhill furnished about thirteen hundred men for the war, which was a surplus of eighty-five over and above all demands. Seventy-three were commissioned officers. The whole amount of
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
ptember 24th, This bounty was authorized to be paid to three-years volunteers until March 1st, 1862. 1862. August 22d, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer enlisting for nine months to the credit of the town, and to borrow money to pay the same. 1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town during this year, although the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers, and the enlisting of volunteers were continued. 1864. August 6th, Voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who has enlisted, or who may enlist under the last call of the President for five hundred thousand men, and who shall be credited to the quota of Hadley. The treasurer was also directed to deposit a sum of money with the State Treasurer to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars for each recruit which the State might furnish. The selectmen were authorized to borrow four thousand two hundred and f
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
ty to the treasurer for money which he may pay for bounties to volunteers enlisting in the nine-months service to the credit of the town. September 6th, Voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to nine-months volunteers. 1863. August 6th, Voted, to pay drafted men three hundred dollars, and to take their notes for the same, the notes to be given in. The selectmen were directed to borrow a thousand dollars for State aid to the families of drafted men. 1864. May 14th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow seventeen hundred and fifty dollars for bounty and recruiting purposes. August 6th, Voted, to borrow five thousand dollars for the same purposes; and the selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer enlisting for three years to the credit of the town. This bounty was paid until the end of the war. Hanover furnished about one hundred and eighty men, and had a surplus of twenty-two at the end of the war ove