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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 300 300 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 56 56 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 20 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 12 12 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 11 11 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for August 7th or search for August 7th in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The sea life of 1861: life on the Federal war-ships (search)
Commodore David Porter, in the War of 1812. In that old namesake Farragut had his first training as a fighter and about the newer Essex there hung much of the spirit of the navy of former days. Aboard of her too there was abundant opportunity to exemplify that spirit as nobly as was ever done by sailors any-where. From Fort Henry till the fall of Port Hudson the Essex was always in the thick of the fight. One of the Essex's most important services came in the action of July 15, 1862. On Aug. 7 the Arkansas and two gunboats were lying above Baton Rouge ready to cooperate with the Confederate troops in a combined attack on that place. The troops with the aid of the Federal gunboats were defeated. Then Commander W. D. Porter started up-stream with the Essex. As he approached the Arkansas, a few well-directed shots disabled her so that she became unmanageable. Porter, seeing his advantage, loaded with incendiary shells, but at the first discharge the Arkansas was seen to be alread
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The Confederate cruisers and the Alabama : the Confederate destroyers of commerce (search)
lying outside the harbor of St. Pierre, Martinique, and cruised to Gibraltar. There the Sumter was blockaded by the Tuscarora, the Kearsarge and the Ino. Semmes, seeing that escape was impossible, sold his vessel and disbanded her crew. Her prizes totalled fifteen, and Semmes was soon making another record for himself in the Alabama. The Florida was the first cruiser built for the Confederacy abroad. She was allowed to clear from Liverpool on March 22, 1862, under the name Oreto. On August 7th she began her career under Captain John Newland Maffit, with a crew of but twenty-two men. She had an adventurous career till she ran into the harbor of Bahia, Oct. 5, 1864, where she encountered a vessel of Wilke's flying squadron, the Wachusett. Commander Napoleon Collins, in violation of the neutrality laws, suddenly attacked the Florida and received her surrender. The Clarence was burned. Within two weeks the Tacony had ten prizes, and the coast between Chesapeake and Casco bays