hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 300 300 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 56 56 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 20 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 12 12 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 11 11 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 5 5 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for August 7th or search for August 7th in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
is little changed, and retains her old grace and charm of manner. August 4. Out early with my sister. We have a regular and restful plan of living. Meet after dinner, coffee with my sister at half-past 4, supper at halfpast seven in the evening reading aloud and conversation. I am miserable with pain, probably rheumatic, in my left hip. Think I must have got a chill on the Rhine boat. I say nothing about this. Daisy and Wintie [Mr. and Mrs. Winthrop Chanler] came this afternoon. August 7. To Anglican service with my dear sister. A dull sermon. The service indifferently read — just the stereotyped Church of England article. My dreadful hip joint does not ache to-day, and I am ready to skip about with joy at the relief even if it prove but temporary. The pain has been pretty severe and I have said nought about it, fearing treatment. August 9. Read Aristotle, as I have done all these days. Took up St. Paul's Epistle to the Romans, with a more distinct view than heretof
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
7. Oak Glen.... my son and his wife came over from Bristol to pass the day. He looks as young as my grandsons do. At fifty, his hair is blond, without gray, and his forehead unwrinkled. July 16.... while in church I had a new thought of the energy and influence of Christ's teaching. ask and ye shall receive, etc. These little series of commands all incite the hearers to action: ask, seek, knock. I should love to write a sermon on this, but fear my sermonizing days are over, alas! August 7. determined to do more literary work daily than I have been doing lately. Began a screed about dear Broa Sam, feeling that he deserved a fuller mention than I have already given him.... September 4. Discouraged over the confusion of my papers, the failure of printers to get on with my book, and my many bills. Have almost had an attack of the moral sickness which the Italians call Achidia. I suppose it to mean indifference and indolence.... To Laura Oak Glen, September 6, 1899. .