Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for August 10th or search for August 10th in all documents.

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charged in upon a number of wounded and stragglers. Then followed the scene which has been sufficiently described in these columns. On the whole, the newspapers which have come from the North within the last few days are most interesting. The tone in which the calamity is discussed is, we think, very creditable to the people of the Northern States; and, strange to say, it has not increased, but, as far as one can judge, has lessened the bitterness toward the Southerners.--London Times, August 10. We have as yet no detailed official account of the battle at Bull Run; but the additional information received during the last few days all tends to show that the earliest accounts of the engagement published were not only inaccurate, but, so far as the defeat of the North was concerned, absurdly exaggerated. This was perfectly natural, as the narratives were those of sutlers and civilians, who saw and knew nothing of the action except the retreat, and who appear to have formed their
61: Light Company F, 2d regiment of Artillery, marched in company with the other troops comprising Gen. Lyon's command from Springfield on the evening of Friday, Aug. 9, for the position occupied by the enemy. Early on the following morning, Aug. 10, the camp of the Southern army was discovered about one mile and a half south of the head of Gen. Lyon's column, and soon after the infantry of our advance was fired upon by the pickets of the enemy. From that time our march, as directed by Gen this order, and to direct that the troops should hold themselves in readiness to move whenever ordered. Our men were consequently kept under arms till toward daybreak, expecting, momentarily, an order to march. The morning of Saturday, the 10th of August, found them still encamped at Wilson's Creek, fatigued by a night's watching and loss of rest. About six o'clock, I received a messenger from Gen. Rains that the enemy were advancing in great force from the direction of Springfield, and we
four separate columns, at nine o'clock that night, so as to surround the city and begin a simultaneous attack at daybreak. The darkness of the night and a threatened storm caused General McCulloch, just as the army was about to march, to countermand this order, and to direct that the troops should hold themselves in readiness to move whenever ordered. Our men were consequently kept under arms till toward daybreak, expecting, momentarily, an order to march. The morning of Saturday, the 10th of August, found them still encamped at Wilson's Creek, fatigued by a night's watching and loss of rest. About six o'clock, I received a messenger from Gen. Rains that the enemy were advancing in great force from the direction of Springfield, and were already within 200 or 300 yards of the position where he was encamped with the Second Brigade of his division, consisting of about 1,200 mounted men under Col. Cawthorn. A second messenger came immediately afterward from Gen. Rains to announce th