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ing the movements of the troops, and encouraging them to the manifestation of the remarkable tone they preserved throughout the entire battle. Cincinnati times narrative. on the battle-field, eight miles from Culpeper Court-House, Va., August 10. dear times: At ten o'clock A. M. of the ninth orders were received in camp at Culpeper for all the forces forming the corps of Major-General Banks to instantly advance on the road leading to Orange, Gen. Williams's division being already inrdnance stores. I am, Colonel, your obedient servant. T. J. Jackson, Major-General. Col. R. H. Chilton, A. A.G. Richmond Enquirer account. An intelligent correspondent sends us the following, dated on the battle-field, Sunday morning, August tenth, three A. M.: Gen. Jackson has fought the Yankees, and has again whipped them. We left from above Gordonsville on Friday, about half-past 3 o'clock A. M., on an advance movement. About the middle of the day our cavalry came in contact wit
n that General Banks was aided most signally throughout the engagement by Brigadier-General Roberts, Gen. Pope's Chief of Cavalry, assigned to him as his adviser upon the field. He was seen everywhere by turns, assisting in arranging and superintending the movements of the troops, and encouraging them to the manifestation of the remarkable tone they preserved throughout the entire battle. Cincinnati times narrative. on the battle-field, eight miles from Culpeper Court-House, Va., August 10. dear times: At ten o'clock A. M. of the ninth orders were received in camp at Culpeper for all the forces forming the corps of Major-General Banks to instantly advance on the road leading to Orange, Gen. Williams's division being already in advance. This division came upon the enemy stationed in position at what is known as Slaughter's Mountain, eight miles distant from Culpeper. About eleven A. M. a dash was made upon the enemy, stationed on a knoll, from which they were driven, and
cers and men. Brig.-Gen. Charles S. Winder was mortally wounded while ably discharging his duty at the head of his command, which was the advance of the left wing of the army. We have collected about one thousand five hundred small arms, and other ordnance stores. I am, Colonel, your obedient servant. T. J. Jackson, Major-General. Col. R. H. Chilton, A. A.G. Richmond Enquirer account. An intelligent correspondent sends us the following, dated on the battle-field, Sunday morning, August tenth, three A. M.: Gen. Jackson has fought the Yankees, and has again whipped them. We left from above Gordonsville on Friday, about half-past 3 o'clock A. M., on an advance movement. About the middle of the day our cavalry came in contact with the Yankee cavalry, and after a sharp engagement they took to their heels, losing about twenty killed. We took about forty prisoners, with their camp and camp equipage. Our loss was none. Our troops encamped Friday night on Garnett's farm. Early
Towle, Eleventh Massachusetts, slightly; Jas. H. Sutcliffe, Eleventh Massachusetts, slightly. The casualties in the Eleventh Massachusetts were all by a single shell. Besides the above, the Sixteenth Massachusetts lost seven or eight, and the Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania as many. We picketed last night nearly or quite to White Oak Swamps, and some distance up the river. The men are immensely elated at regaining old battle-fields. C. A. P. Richmond Examiner account. Richmond, August 10. An officer who participated in the affair at Malvern Hill has furnished us with the following particulars with reference to the occupancy of that point by the enemy, and its subsequent recovery by our forces under General Longstreet: On Tuesday morning the Eighth Georgia regiment, Capt. Lawson commanding, was moved up from New-Market Heights to relieve the Seventeenth, then on picket on Malvern Hill. On the march they were met by several couriers, stating that the enemy were in lar