Your search returned 545 results in 229 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Robert E. Park, Macon, Georgia, late Captain Twelfth Alabama regiment, Confederate States army. (search)
ceived, and we left camp, marched six miles towards Winchester, formed line of battle, and slept on our arms all night. August 11th Went to Winchester and formed line of battle. Then Battle's brigade was ordered on picket duty two miles beyond Middletown. Marched over twenty miles during the day. August 12th Left the picket-post, marched through Strasburg, and halted at our old camp near Barb's tannery, on the Back road. At night the Twelfth Alabama went again on picket. August 13th The brigade was in order of battle in the hot sun all day. August 14th Still in line of battle. Rude breastworks of rails were thrown up, but the enemy kept aloof. Although we have thrown up scores of earthworks, we have never been called upon to fight behind them. August 17th Left our post for Winchester, and on our route saw where several large barns, loaded with wheat, corn and hay, had been burnt by order of General Sheridan. One large flouring mill, of great necessit
t officers and patriots in the army, writes from Nashville, November 5, 1837: I have just returned from the Hermitage, where I spent all last week, and have had many and long conversations with the old chief in relation to the next campaign. He will be pleased to see you, if you can make it convenient to pass this way. Hon. Henry D. Gilpin, the Attorney-General, and a confidential friend of President Van Buren, had married the widow of Senator Johnston. He wrote to General Johnston, August 13th, kindly urging him to visit him at Washington. He says: It is very evident the annexation of Texas to our Union is to form a subject of importance and of contest too; I am sure your presence and information might often, very often, be of service. He adds: When we saw you at the head of the army, we began to think of Cortes and De Soto; and conjectured that you would have as many toils among swamps, mountains, and prairies, as the one, to end in your putting a new flag on the same walls,
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 16: second Manassa's. (search)
uggle, which was destined, by a strange coincidence; for the historic plains of Manassa's. General Jackson had scarcely returned to his encampment near Gordonsville, when the gathering of the hostile masses in larger volume began. General Lee, convinced that McClellan was incapable of farther aggression, and that the surest way to remove him finally from the peninsula would be to threaten Washington more violently, began to remove the remainder of his army from Richmond to the Rapid Ann, August 13th; proposing to leave only a small force for observation upon his lines there, until the success of his experiment was verified. On that day, General Longstreet commenced his march for Gordonsville, and the remainder of the troops were moved in the same direction, the division of General D. H. Hill bringing up the rear, near the end of the month. Halleck, the new Federal generalissimo, was also eagerly dictating the same movement to McClellan. He found the Grand army divided into two wid
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, V. August, 1861 (search)
Tochman by everybody, he has intimated to the President his expectation of being commissioned a brigadier. The President, on his part, has promptly and emphatically, as is sometimes his wont, declared his purpose to give him no such commission. He never, for a moment, thought of making him more than a colonel. To this the major demurs, and furnishes a voluminous correspondence to prove that his claims for the position of brigadier-general had been recognized by the Secretary of War. August 13 The President sent to the department an interesting letter from Mr. Zollicoffer, in Tennessee, relating to the exposed condition of the country, and its capacities for defense. August 14 Zollicoffer has been appointed a brigadiergen-eral; and although not a military man by education, I think he will make a good officer. August 15 No clew yet to the spies in office who furnish the Northern press with information. The matter will pass uninvestigated. Such is our indifference
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 18 (search)
nd let them have it. Nine-tenths of the enemy fell, and the rest were soon dispatched, before they could get away. One of their dying officers said they would have surrendered to us, if we had demanded it. He was reminded of Pope's beastly orders, and died with a horrible groan. August 12 Pope claims a victory! So did McClellan. But truth will rise, in spite of everything. I will not quote Bryant literally, because he is an enemy in this war, and falsifies his own precepts. August 13 McClellan is gone, bag and baggage, abandoning his base; to attain which, he said he had instituted his magnificent strategic movements, resulting in an unmolested retreat from the Peninsula and flight to Washington, for the defense of his own capital. So the truth they crushed to earth on the Chickahominy has risen again, and the Yankees, like the Cretans, are to be known henceforth as a nation of liars. August 14 Lee has gone up the country to command in person. Now let Lincol
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXIX. August, 1863 (search)
ns, etc., and arrived at Hagerstown 7th July. The Potomac was much swollen by recent rains, that had fallen incessantly ever since he had crossed it, and was unfordable. The enemy had not yet appeared, until the 12th, when, instead of attacking, Meade fortified his lines. On the 13th Gen. Lee crossed at Falling Waters, the river subsiding, by fords and a bridge, without loss, the enemy making no interruption. Only some stragglers, sleeping, fell into the hands of the enemy. August 13 No news. It turns out that Gen. Taylor got only 500 prisoners at Donaldsonville, La., instead of 4000. A writer in the New York Tribune says the Northern troops burnt Jackson, Miss. Lincoln has marked for close confinement and hostages three of our men for three free negroes taken on Morris Island. The government here has, at last, indicated blockade-goods (U. S.) which are to be seized; also sent circular letters to the generals at Wilmington, Charleston, and Mobile to im
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 42 (search)
erday Gen. Hood said no important change had occurred, etc. I saw a soldier to-day from Gen. Early's army near Martinsburg, and the indications were that it was on the eve of crossing the Potomac. He left it day before yesterday, 10th inst. He says Kershaw's division was at Culpepper C. H., 50 miles from Early. Detachments of troops are daily passing through the city, northward. All is quiet below on the James River. Grant's campaign against Richmond is confessedly a failure. August 13 Hot and dry. Large green worms have attacked my tomatoes, and from the leaves are proceeding to the fruit. But not many of them will escape! I am warring on them. No war news, except the continuation of the movement of troops northward. Hampton's division of cavalry, at least three brigades, passed this morning. From Mobile and Atlanta we have nothing of interest. Flour is falling: it is now $200 per barrel-$500 a few weeks ago; and bacon is falling in price also, from $11
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
o move without detaching from his force for that purpose. Subordinate reports of operations in the Shenandoah Valley from August 4 to December 31, 1864, will appear in Vol. XLIII. Reports from various sources led me to believe that the enemy had detached three divisions from Petersburg to re-enforce Early in the Shenandoah Valley. I therefore sent the Second Corps and Gregg's division of cavalry, of the Army of the Potomac, and a force of General Butler's army, on the night of the 13th of August, to threaten Richmond from the north side of the James, to prevent him from sending troops away, and, if possible, to draw back those sent. In this move we captured 6 pieces of artillery and several hundred prisoners, detained troops that were under marching orders, and ascertained that but one division (Kershaw's) of the three reputed detached had gone. The enemy having withdrawn heavily from Petersburg to resist this movement, the Fifth Corps, General Warren commanding, was moved out
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
of the Twentieth Army Corps, near the Chattanooga railroad, and two others in front of the Sixteenth Corps. The whole of the Army of the Tennessee advanced about three-eighths of a mile in the manner already described, and the lines of the Army of the Cumberland were straightened, so the whole line was as far advanced as the salients had been. The Army of the Ohio was engaged in intrenching itself in its position south of Utoy Creek. August 10, 11, and 12, no advances were made. August 13, it was decided to move all the army, except one corps (which was to be thrown back to the Chattahoochee railroad bridge), around Atlanta upon the railroads running south from East Point, and the pontoon train of the Army of the Cumberland was moved from the railroad bridge, along the north side of the river, to the Sandtown Ferry preparatory to throwing a bridge across the river at that point. August 14, nothing was done by the engineer department, waiting further instructions. Au
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
s old works. July 28, 29, 30, and 31, occupied same position. August 1 in the evening relieved one brigade of General Hascall's division on the front line. August 2, occupied same position. August 3, made demonstration with skirmish line; lost 8 men wounded. August 4. same position. August 5, made demonstration with skirmish line. August 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11, all quiet. August 12, advanced skirmish line 300 or 400 yards, met very little resistance, and returned to old position. August 13, 14, and 15, occupied same position. August 16, shifted position to the left, the length of the brigade. August 17 and 18, all quiet. August 19, put the brigade in position on the Augusta railroad to the left of picket-line, deployed Ninetieth Ohio, One hundred and first Ohio, and Twenty-first Illinois as skirmishers and advanced onehalf mile, drove the enemy's skirmishers into their rifle-pits, and withdrew. In the afternoon made similar demonstrations. August 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, and
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...