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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,017 1,017 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 22 22 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 16 16 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 15 15 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 19, 1861., [Electronic resource] 14 14 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 13 13 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 9 9 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for August 16th or search for August 16th in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 31: operations of Farragut's vessels on the coast of Texas, etc. (search)
essel through the gut and attacking one of the schooners, she was soon driven ashore and burned. Another one was also set on fire by the enemy. He then ran across the bay to Corpus Christi, with his little flotilla following him, and called upon the authorities to surrender and for the military forces to evacuate the town. The Confederates set fire to a sloop on his approach and asked for a truce of forty-eight hours. At the end of that time they refused to evacuate the place, and on August 16th opened fire on Kittredge's vessel from a battery planted behind the levee. This was replied to with spirit by the Union vessels, which kept up such an incessant and accurate fire on the enemy, that they were three times driven from their guns on that day. At night-fall the Union forces withdrew out of range. The next day the Confederates set fire to a steamer that had run aground and could not be moved. On August 20th, Lieutenant Kittredge went to work again on the enemy. He landed