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Parrotts and two 80-pounder Whitworths, likewise intended for Fort Sumter, had been established by Col. Serrell in the first parallel, which was manned by Admiral Dahlgren from the navy, under Captain Foxhall A. Parker; and which, in one week Aug. 17-23. of service, made a decided change in the physiognomy of that obstinate structure. Com'r Geo. W. Rodgers, of the Catskill, was killed. Still other breaching batteries were simultaneously established on the left, 800 yards farther from Sumterifled Parrott, named by the soldiers the Swamp Angel. Protected by a sand-bag parapet and epaulement, it was soon made ready to transmit the compliments of the besiegers to the heart of the Rebellion. When all was ready, fire was opened Aug. 17. with shot and shell, from twelve batteries of heavy guns, on Sumter, Wagner, and the Cumming's Point batteries, but mainly on Sumter — the breaching guns being served with great care and deliberation — the distance of our batteries from Sumter
ur lines, and were each time repulsed with heavy loss; being finally driven from the field, leaving on it as many of his men killed or desperately wounded as the whole number of our killed, wounded, and missing. Gen. Smith made no farther advance; but there was a sharp, indecisive cavalry skirmish next day at Old Town creek; after which our army was withdrawn to the vicinity of Memphis ; whence Smith once more advanced, Aug. 4. with 10,000 men, by Holly Springs to the Tallahatchie; Aug. 17. but found. no enemy to fight, save a very small body of cavalry. Forrest's main body had been drawn off for service elsewhere. Smith remained in this region several days, and then returned to Memphis; whence he was soon called to the aid of Rosecrans in Missouri, as has already been stated. But while Smith was vainly hunting for Forrest in Mississippi, that chieftain reported himself in person at Memphis. Taking, 3,000 of his best-mounted men, Forrest flanked Aug. 18. our army by
ith every nation. We are just as much inclined to praise and glorify our own institutions as the Americans are their own, and we quote with avidity from foreign journals whatever contributes to our own self-esteem. This national vanity, so far from being censurable, is, within certain limits, to be respected and admired, and as we so largely indulge in it ourselves, we ought at least to make a liberal al lowance for those who follow our example, and, it may be, exceed it.--European Times, Aug. 17. An English comment on English criticism. The battle of Bull Run has produced an extraordinary effect upon our English asses. Ever since the news arrived they have been lifting up their voices in one huge bray, and there is no telling when they will give over. It is not a bray of sympathy, of sorrow, or even of triumph. On the contrary, it is a highly moral bray, articulating lofty lessons for the advantage of all people, Englishmen especially. Yesterday we dealt with one of these
Western army which was to hold Missouri in bondage as the basis of a grand movement for the subjugation of the States on the Lower Mississippi. They have been broken and dispersed. Southwestern Missouri is free already. The Southeast cannot long stand before the advancing armies of Pillow and Hardee, joined to those of McCulloch; and the next word will be: On to St. Louis! That taken, the power of Lincolnism is broken in the whole West; and instead of shouting, Ho! for Richmond! and Ho! for New Orleans! there will be hurryings to and fro among the frightened magnates at Washington, and anxious inquiries of what they shall do to save themselves from the vengeance to come. Good tidings reach us from the North and the West. Heaven smiles on the arms of the Confederate States; and through the brightly-beaming vistas of these battles we see golden promises of the speedy triumph of a righteous cause — in the firm establishment of Southern independence.--N. O. Picayune, August 17
Western army which was to hold Missouri in bondage as the basis of a grand movement for the subjugation of the States on the Lower Mississippi. They have been broken and dispersed. Southwestern Missouri is free already. The Southeast cannot long stand before the advancing armies of Pillow and Hardee, joined to those of McCulloch; and the next word will be: On to St. Louis! That taken, the power of Lincolnism is broken in the whole West; and instead of shouting, Ho! for Richmond! and Ho! for New Orleans! there will be hurryings to and fro among the frightened magnates at Washington, and anxious inquiries of what they shall do to save themselves from the vengeance to come. Good tidings reach us from the North and the West. Heaven smiles on the arms of the Confederate States; and through the brightly-beaming vistas of these battles we see golden promises of the speedy triumph of a righteous cause — in the firm establishment of Southern independence.--N. O. Picayune, August 17
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 6: contraband of War, Big Bethel and Hatteras. (search)
Now, the President well knew that General Wool could not do anything, simply because he was too old and infirm, a fact that he knew as well as anybody. It was evident, too, from Scott's letter that he also knew it, because he wrote Wool telling him that if his health would allow it, it would be desirable that he should be sent to Fortress Monroe. Thereupon Wool came there; but there was no order to relieve me, and I was not at liberty to leave the department. Wool got there on the 17th of August, and I turned over the command to him. There was nothing I could complain of. A very much older soldier, and a very efficient military officer when he was younger, was ordered to command in my department; and although he had been assigned only to the Department of South Eastern Virginia, yet I supposed that meant the whole Department of Virginia and North Carolina. At any rate, I did not choose to struggle on that point, and so I turned over the command to him, using these words:--No pe
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 6: Louisiana. 1859-1861. (search)
red — the cadets to their homes, and the professors wherever they pleased — all to meet again on the 1st day of the next November. Major Smith and I agreed to meet in New York on a certain day in August, to purchase books, models, etc. I went directly to my family in Lancaster, and after a few days proceeded to Washington, to endeavor to procure from the General Government the necessary muskets and equipments for our cadets by the beginning of the next term. I was in Washington on the 17th day of August, and hunted up my friend Major Buell, of the Adjutant-General's Department, who was on duty with the Secretary of War, Floyd. I had with me a letter of Governor Moore's, authorizing me to act in his name. Major Buell took me into Floyd's room at the War Department, to whom I explained my business, and I was agreeably surprised to meet with such easy success. Although the State of Louisiana had already drawn her full quota of arms, Floyd promptly promised to order my requisition to b
In addition to being an educated and skilful military engineer, he had considerable experience in the special duties required in these operations. General Gillmore, despite the enemy's defensive works, landed his force on Morris Island on the tenth of July, and immediately commenced the slow and difficult operations of conducting the siege of Fort Wagner, and establishing batteries against Fort Sumpter. Without, however, waiting for the reduction of the former, he opened, on the seventeenth of August, his fire on the latter, and, on the twenty-third, after seven days bombardment, Fort Sumter was reported a shapeless and harmless mass of ruins. Being under the fire of other forts of the enemy, and inaccessible by land, our troops could not occupy it, and a few guns have since been temporarily remounted, but they have been as often silenced. General Gillmore now vigorously pushed forward his sappers against Fort Wagner, and on the morning of the seventh of September, took possess
, Mahaska, Ottawa, Dai-Ching, Racer, Dan. Smith. Aug. 15WagnerMortar-boats Racer, Dan. Smith. Aug. 17Rebel batteries on Morris Island, to direct fire from our batteries which opened on SumterWeehaw July 3032921,800Fort GreggAt anchor. July 301 2,250Fort Sumter50-pounder rifle on spar deck. Aug. 1740031900Fort WagnerMost of the hits were from 10-inch guns in Wagner and Gregg. At anchor. AugAug. 1730 1,700Fort Gregg  Aug. 172 2,700Fort Sumter50-pounder rifle on spar deck. Aug. 18118  Fort WagnerUnder way; distance varied from 1,200 to 1,400 yds. Aug. 1950 1,100Fort WagnerAt anchor. AugAug. 172 2,700Fort Sumter50-pounder rifle on spar deck. Aug. 18118  Fort WagnerUnder way; distance varied from 1,200 to 1,400 yds. Aug. 1950 1,100Fort WagnerAt anchor. Aug. 20158 1,150Fort WagnerAt anchor. Aug. 202 3,400Rebel Steamer50-pounder rifle on spar deck. Aug. 217011,300Fort WagnerAt auchor; hit from Sumter; 11-inch shot, solid. Aug. 22115  Fort WagnerUnder, 2 shells; 150-pounder, 2 shellsNone1,200Black Steamer and Battery GreggWhile on picket duty. Aug. 1715-inch, 30 shells; 150-pounder, 9 shellsThirteen1,200Fort Wagner and Fort Sumter Dis
the remaining three to-morrow and next day. Headquarters will remain here until nearly the last. We are going, not to Richmond, but to Fort Monroe, I am ashamed to say! . . . . It is a terrible blow to me, but I have done all that could be done to prevent it, without success, so I must submit as best I can and carry it out. I shall, of course, conduct the march to Fortress Monroe and attend to the embarkation thence; my mind is pretty much made up to try hard to break off at that point. Aug. 17, 3 P. M., Barrett's Ferry, Chickahominy.--. . . I have the greater part of the army now over, and if we are not disturbed for six hours more all will be well. I have abandoned neither men nor material, and the retreat has been conducted in the most orderly manner, and is a perfect success, so far as so disgusting an operation can be. I learn that all the troops in Virginia are to be placed under my command. Burnside came down to assure me from Halleck that he (H.) is really my friend--qu'
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